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Full text of "Microcosm"






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World Within A World 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



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Microcosm, 1961 



Simmons College 




1961 









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MICROCOSM STAFF 



EDITOR 



ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



ART EDITOR 



LITERARY EDITORS 



TECHNICAL EDITORS 



PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR 



ADVERTISING EDITORS 



CIRCULATION EDITOR 



BUSINESS EDITOR 



SECRETARY 



ASSISTANTS 



Gaila Keith 

Penny Morgenstern 

Adele Adelson 

Judith Horkheimer Eckert 
Robin Sherwood 

Patricia Campbell 
Susan Fried 

Lois Berman 

Myrna Chaison 
Diane Torto 

Regina Mitsch 

Barbara Greenberg 

Harriet Adler 

Suzanne Brooks 
Nancy Howe 
Merle Senkler 



ADVISORS 



Raymond Bosworth 
Virginia Bratton 
Dino Valz 
Simmons L^olhye <=Librarij 

4 




A&MIHISTRfiTlOH 




SCHOOLS 




QAGAMZATIQHS 







SEMORS 



Dedication: Lyle K. Bush, Associate Professor of Art 

"The same stream of life that runs through my veins night and day runs through the world and dances 
in rhythmic measures.'" 

Art is not an appreciation of life; it is life itself. Mr. Bush made art meaningful to us as he made our 
life in college meaningful. He showed us that art is a part of history, a part of time, and a necessary 
release for man. 

It was Mr. Bush who allowed us to dream, who encouraged us to explore, and who helped us find our- 
selves within a lump of clay, on canvas, with a water color brush, or through literary expression into all 
artistic areas. 

We will remember his concern for the college — its ideals, its values. He helped us realize that art was 
not a frosting for our professional training, but the very core of what has value. His classes represent the 
necessary creative element, without which an education whithers. 

We dedicate our book to one who saw and gave, and who helped us to see and to give — not only with 
our eyes, but our hearts. 



The whole is a sum of its parts, each 
part an expression of the whole. The design 
itself as a whole and as a chain of parts is 
strong and purposeful. The line is fluid, the 
color is pure. Each form speaks simplicity; 
yet in the same breath, intricacy. The de- 
sign reads of nature — a star in night, a 
blazing sun, wind, and earthly revolutions. 
The design is an expression of time — of 
eternity, perhaps, but for now it is the cul- 
mination of four years' time. 

Each year in four has added a new di- 
mension, another earth, another path of rev- 
olution, another sphere of reality in ourselves 
— a dimension within us that we never knew 
existed. 

Simmons has given us our ground plan to 
build on — the black silhouette of beginning. 
We accepted the purpose and ideal of our 
education. Our learning in and outside lec- 
ture halls has added to the basic pattern 
that was shaped and spun by those around 
us. There were times when we questioned 
purpose and plan. But now four years have 
revolved and the design is complete. Per- 
spective gives our design its intricacy. Color, 
form, mass, and space give our design unity 
and diversity. 

In years hence the design will have greater 
perspective; its complexity will have mean- 
ing; its unity will spell beauty. Then we 
shall realize that the design we spun and the 
design Simmons helped us spin is within us. 



ADMIHISTHfiTlOH 



Those who taught us 

made us think and question, and wonder. 

They gave us ideas, 

and we in turn gave them respect. 

Now the design symbolizes an infinite wonder. 

What they gave us 

we have made into a sphere. 

We united our efforts 

to a school in whose goals we believed. 

With many long hours' work 

we acquired not only that which was taught, 

we gained insight, understanding 

and a wordless respect for the educated woman 

whose knowledge reflects her life's work. 



10 



President 
William E. Park 




It is extraordinary in this life how attached one can 
become to people and places. Because your class 
— 1961 — is such a fine one, the faculty and staff of 
Simmons College have formed affectionate ties with you, 
so that we feel bad to think you are leaving us. But, in 
the same way, we are sure that you have become at- 
tached to Simmons College so that you feel sad to be 
leaving. 

However, along with this natural reluctance to face 
the changes that must come — a reluctance I feel each 
year as another class graduates — there are many rea- 
sons to be happy. During your years at Simmons you 
have achieved a solid foundation of general education 
and professional training which will give you a start in 
an interesting and productive career. 

You have made many friends among the faculty 
and student body, friends who will be a source of com- 
fort and stimulation to you always. You have learned 
a great deal about the art of living happily in a large 
community made up of people of varying backgrounds 
and interests. I feel sure that this experience, though 
perhaps difficult at times, will be of inestimable value 
to you throughout your lives. Most of all, you have the 
satisfaction of having started on a course of action 
which you carried through to a successful outcome. In 
other words, the joys that are rightly yours as a result 
of your years at Simmons far outweigh the natural 
sadness in making a change to a new way of life. 

Do not forget that we who remain at Simmons Col- 
lege shall follow the course of your lives with great 
interest. We hope that you will want to support and 
help your college in the years ahead. I regret that your 
class did not have the benefit of the new library build- 
ing which will open next fall, but I do want to remind 
you that it was the devotion and the hard work of the 
graduates of our College which made this greatly 
needed addition to our Campus possible. We shall be 
calling on you as graduates to help strengthen Simmons 
in other ways, so that your ties with us need never be 
broken. 

I salute the members of the Class of 1961, feeling 
sad that you are leaving, glad for our years together. 



12 




Dean 

Eleanor Clifton 

"Microcosm" is tradition in its true form. Occasion- 
ally, in this rather traditionless modern age its con- 
tinued existence has caused expressions of wonder. 
Those who regard a "yearbook" as a rather senti- 
mental prop to memory may choose to think of it as a 
reference book of college experiences. With its help 
you will remember that the Class of 1961 arrived at 
Simmons College — 3 1 1 carefully chosen members, on 
September 16, 1957, representing 205 secondary 
schools. You will recall that it included among its mem- 
bers, June Yamauchi, a freshman from Hawaii who 
lived in Longwood House, who, according to NEWS, 
was "the envy of every girl at Simmons for she has or- 
chids growing in her own front yard." 

Then there was Jackie Denizard from Haiti, who 
found "woolen clothes a novel experience" for she had 
"never seen snow!" It is unlikely that even though the 
members of 1961 gave some thought to the subject 
they might have anticipated that before Jackie wit- 
nessed her first Boston blizzard, the world would enter 
a new era — The Space Age. Almost a month to the day 
after your arrival at Simmons, the first man-made satel- 
lite, known as "Sputnik," encircled the earth. Over- 
night our planet seemed to shrink perceptibly and you 
found yourself in the center of a new national emphasis. 
Everyone began to talk and think about education. 



In spite of sensational articles and speeches about 
space, science and missiles, however, your activities in 
the classroom and on the campus followed rather close- 
ly the pattern of previous classes. There was change 
on the Residence Campus, though. Simmons Hall 
opened its doors to 179 students, a new Director of 
Students, and a new Resident Head. In November you 
elected your first Class President, Marjorie Frost, and 
in December you witnessed your first Olde English 
Dinner, as waitresses for the Class of 1958. The early 
months of the new year found you making your ap- 
pearance in the latest from Paris, "le saque," and plan- 
ning your first social whirl as a Class, "Cloud '61," 
the Freshman Prom. 

On April 23, 1959, you watched as Mr. Park broke 
ground for "the new library," but it was difficult for 
you to realize that this was the culmination of a 
dream of fifty years' duration. May of that year saw 
you enjoying early morning strawberry shortcake at 
your first Sophomore-Senior May Breakfast. And 
when you returned to campus in September 1959, the 
First Annual Convocation of the College was held be- 
tween Evans and Arnold Halls. 

NEWS announced in February of 1960 that your 
own Maxine Lavine would be Stu-G President for 
1960-61. March 11th of that year was the day on 
which you paid "Homage to Camus." With typical 
facility, in April you turned your attention to things 
social and enjoyed your Junior Prom at the Longwood 
Towers. You know how swiftly the fall of 1960 
followed, with your return to Simmons as Seniors. You 
could hardly believe it! All of the events you had an- 
ticipated since September 1957 began to happen, 
rapidly, and finally there it was — your own Senior Week 
in June, Commencement Rehearsal, the final hand- 
shake and your leather bound diploma. 

You will enjoy the reminders you have assembled 
here between the covers of your "MIC." It will mean 
all the human, usual things that make up "dear old 
nostalgia," and it will mean other personal things that 
belong just to you. It records the thrill you experienced 
in discovering new ideas in the laboratory, in your 
reading, in intense discussions, and in all of your con- 
tacts. Most of all, then, the meaning of "MIC" is 
depicted in your own growth. New ways of thinking 
came with this discovering and growing which we hope 
will continue to serve you and, through your leader- 
ship, people everywhere. 



13 




J. GARTON NEEDHAM, 

Vice President and Dean of Instruction 



The Forces That Direct... 



Mr. Sypher and Mr. Needham are two active forces 
behind Simmons' life. Their work is directed not only 
to the college as a whole, but to each girl who seeks 
their help, whether it be a paper on Keats, or a rec- 
ommendation for graduate school, or advice concern- 
ing a problem change. Mr. Sypher made us pursue 
rather than tolerate liberal arts; he made Shakespeare 
live. His integration of English, philosophy, and art 
unified our thought. Mr. Needham's friendly, easy 
manner was known to many of us who came to admire 
his excellence as psychology instructor, vice-president, 
and advisor. The enthusiasm and understanding of 
both men will be remembered by each of us. 



WYLIE SYPHER, 

Dean of the Graduate Division and Chairman 

of the Division of Language, Literature, and 

the Arts 




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JANE ELLEN CURTIN 

Director of Admission 



OFFICE L 

OF THE 

3USINESS MANAGER 




|R. STEERE 
'usiness jWa/iager 



W. EASTMAN STEERE, JR. 
Business Manager 




RICHMOND KNOWLTON BACHELDER 
Treasurer and Comptroller 




ANNA MOORE HANSON 
Director of Placement 



15 






MARGARET FAIRCHILD, Manager of Residence 



MADELINE L. CARTWRIGHT 

Director of Students, Residence Halls 





YVONNE BROADCORENS, Director of Publicity 



BERNICE POUTAS 

Executive Secretary to the Alumnae Association 



16 




EUGENE ACHESON 
Superintendent of Maintenance 





ELIZABETH KUDRIAVETZ, Assistant to the Dean 



PRISCILLA McKEE 
Assistant to the Director of Placement 



V, 



17 




The faculty cafeteria — meeting place for faculty and members of the administration. 



18 





SCHOOLS 



The design grows, an orderly growth, 

following a definite pattern. 

Freshman studies give a general knowledge 

of the sciences and the liberal arts. 

With this background, 

our particular interests are more definable. 

We enter one of Simmons ten schools, 

each with its own program of study, 

combining professional and academic courses. 



20 



School of Nursing 



The School of Nursing is never without dynamic 
growth. With an eye to the future, it is always ready 
to make changes. At this time, the School is busy mak- 
ing a transition from a five-year to a four-year pro- 
gram. 

The School takes advantage of the opportunities of- 
fered by Boston. The first three years have an em- 
phasis on the academic aspect with the main activity 
taking place at the College, but with an affiliation at 
Lemuel Shattuck Hospital. Finally, the program is 
rounded off with affiliations at several Boston hospitals 
and clinics. 

The student in the program reflects the program's 
growth. She is interested in what is happening and is 
eager to understand its philosophy. 



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L. ANN CONLEY, Professor of Nursing and Director 
of the School of Nursing 




Nurses gain experience 
from their hospital 
affiliations. 




School of 
Publication 



The School of Publication teaches 
that spreading the printed word effec- 
tively and imaginatively is truly an art 
— an art based on knowledge of tech- 
niques and tools. By the time she grad- 
uates, the pub student has explored 
every area of her field and the count- 
less possibilities offered by her tools — 
ideas, words, type, paper, color and 
design — until she can use them confi- 
dently and creatively. 



RAYMOND F. BOSWORTH, 
Director of the School of Publication 



Printer's ink on type and fingers, a 

pica ruler, a hand press, a tired back, 

and at last — the finished product! 




22 




DOROTHY F. WILLIAMS, Managing Editor 

of the Simmons Review, and MARIAN 

LOMBARDO, Editorial Assistant 





DONALD L. FESSENDEN, 
Journalism 



VIRGINIA L. BR ALTON, 
Graphic Design and Printing Workshop 



23 




School of 



Library Science 



KENNETH R. SHAFFER 

Director of School of Library Science 




Library Science students frequently do research for answers to reference problems. 



24 



The School of Library Science offers both a one-year graduate program of 
librarianship and a four-year undergraduate program. Here the student learns 
the policies and organization of the library, and at the same time comes to deeply 
appreciate the meaning of the word "book" — as a medium of communication, as an 
art, as a way of educating. 

As the science student needs to experiment with chemicals in the laboratory, so 
must the library student have access to books in the library. Hence, the new build- 
ing is a source of great enthusiasm in the School of Library Science. In addition to 
housing an aesthetically-pleasing, well-equipped library for all Simmons students, 
the new building also contains many features of particular interest to the School 
of Library Science. The entire Library School, including classrooms, faculty offices, 
and the Library School's own specialized library (which is, in essence, a labor- 
atory), will be relocated in the new building. The improved facilities should help 
to further augment the excellent and growing reputation which the School of 
Library Science has enjoyed since its birth, early in the history of Simmons. 




The new library building will give the Library Science School facilities comparable to the best in the country. 



25 



School of Social Science 




PAUL NICHOLS, 

Associate Professor of Economics 




The School of Social Science offers 
four basic programs — public adminis- 
tration, economic analysis, community 
work, and psychological measure- 
ments. These programs are designed 
to give the student a broad general 
education, training in her field and an 
opportunity to reach beyond the class- 
room. Field trips and volunteer work 
put her directly in the setting she will 
encounter after graduation. 




JOHN HUNTER, 

Assistant Professor of History 



BRUCE HAWTHORNE, 
Assistant Professor of History 



26 





ROY TOLLEFSON, 
Associate Professor of Government 



CARROLL MILES, Director of the School of Social Science 




LAWRENCE SMITH, 
Lecturer on Economics 



SOCIAL STUDIES 

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HENRY HALKO, 
Associate Professor of History 



27 




HAROLD L. HODGKINSON, Director of the School of Education 



School of Education 



The Simmons School of Education endows the student with the ability to trans- 
mit facts and ideas intelligently and imaginatively. The School offers programs in 
the fields of English, Language, History and Social Studies, Science and Mathe- 
matics. 

The courses give the student a mastery of the subject matter along with the 
tools and methods from which to build a proficiency in teaching. 

An important part of the Education curriculum is practice teaching, an experi- 
ence which gives the opportunity to test and develop theories learned in the 
classroom. 

In the education courses, answers are never given, but problems are always 
posed. The goal of this School is not to give the student one specific philosophy of 
education. Rather, it gives her the background and the intellectual curiosity from 
which to build her own philosophy and test her own ideas. 



28 




Future teachers are also taught. MRS. SAPIN, Instructor in Education and 
English, discusses methods of instruction with students in Education. 




Practice teaching is an integral part 
of the School of Education program. 
The student applies textbook theory to 
the actual classroom experience. 




School of 
Business 



TILLY DICKINSON, 

Associate Professor of Secretarial Studies 



Graduates of the School of Business, with a 
combined program of liberal arts and profes- 
sional training behind them, find that their 
field offers a wide scope of job opportunities. 
Whether a student's interest lies in advertising, 
personnel, office or medical administration; 
whether her preference is for bilingual secre- 
tarial work or accounting, the skills developed 
at Simmons equip her for the kind of specializa- 
tion that today's business world demands. 




A Simmons girl prepares for a career in the business world. 



30 




EDWIN MORAN, JR., Instructor in Secretarial Studies and MARGARET ANN McKENNA, 

Assistant Professor of Secretarial Studies 




WOODROW W. BALDWIN, Professor of Business, 
and Director of the School of Business 



31 




JOHN ARREND TIMM, 
Director of School of Science 



School of Science 

The student in the School of Science is given the op- 
portunity to explore the fields of biology, chemistry, 
physics, physical therapy, orthoptics, medical tech- 
nology, or mathematics. She spends hours on end in 
class and in the laboratory, but by the time she has 
fulfilled her requirements, she has mastered the basic 
techniques of her chosen field and has attained the 
competence to build on this knowledge. 

Whether she goes on to higher education, individual 
research, or to work in industry, the foundations given 
her at Simmons have shown her that creativity is not 
limited to the liberal arts. In the various fields of sci- 
ence, there is infinite room for discovery and creation. 





ALLEN D. BLISS, 
Professor of Chemistry 



PHILIP M. RICHARDSON, 
Professor of Biology 



32 




Anything from amoebas through 
human cells are explored under the 
eye of the microscope. 




DAVID SHEPRO, 
Associate Professor of Biology 




Science students learn everything about 
human anatomy from the inside out. 



33 



MARGARET ROSS, Professor of Nutrition, and 
Director of the School of Home Economics 





Individual instruction in the careful preparation 
of food helps each student master the art 

of cookery. 



LYDIA GERHARDT, Assistant Professor of 

Child Development, and Director of the 

Nursery School, checks the throat of one 

of her young charges. 




34 



School of Home Economics 



Working over a hot stove, playing with children in the Nursery School, sewing, 
and acquiring a workable knowledge of dietary needs are the beginnings of the 
education of the student in the School of Home Economics. As artistry with pots, 
pans, and the sewing machine grows, the Home Economics student finds her courses 
leading her to a wide choice of careers. Five areas of specialization are open to her. 

She can teach in junior or senior high schools or do extension work. If she 
majored in child development and spent one semester at Merrill Palmer Institute 
in Detroit, Michigan, she has a range of careers open to her in this important field. 
The consumer service program offers students preparation for work in advertising 
agencies, publications, test kitchens, or the textile and clothing industries. 

Another major offering in the school is that of institution management and 
dietetics for girls who wish to become dietitians in hospital kitchens, restaurants, 
schools and colleges, or other areas involving food service. A variety of interesting 
positions are possible on the national as well as the international level. Foods and 
nutrition majors may pursue research work in government departments or private 
industry. 

The graduate from the School of Home Economics is, therefore, prepared for 
an exciting career as well as equipped to be an excellent homemaker. 



Muffins, hot from the oven, are carefully taken 

from the tin. 





The sparkling modern kitchens make this 
part of the Home Economics training fun. 



Prince School of Retailing 




BARBARA HALEY, Associate Professor of Retailing, 

and Acting Director of the Prince School of 

Retailing, teaches future sales executives. 



Prince — the morning cab rides, Miss 
Stewart's color charts, the forty-to-sixty- 
hour weeks of Marketing Research proj- 
ects, and the fashion show. 

Instructors as well as students, the 
Prince girls teach in department store 
training programs. They are brought out 
of the classroom and directly into the 
busy world of buying and selling in six 
weeks of senior field work. 

Retailing majors are just as much a 
part of Simmons as are the other stu- 
dents, although the center of their activ- 
ity is 49 Commonwealth Avenue, where 
they have their own classrooms and li- 
brary. They attend lectures in the Boston 
stores as well as the Tobe lectures at 
Harvard. 

Writing, producing, and modeling in 
the annual fashion show culminates four 
years of study in the Prince School, and 
prepares the student for an exciting ca- 
reer in the world of fashion. 



The Prince fashion show, an 

annual event where seniors 

model the latest styles. 




36 



Department of Psychology 
and Philosophy 




STEPHEN R. DEANE, Professor of Psychology and 
Chairman of the Division of Philosophy and Psychology 




FREDERICK M. ANDERSON 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy 




HELEN M. JONES 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 



37 




KENNETH GREENE 
Associate Professor of English 




EDITH HELMAN, Professor of Spanish 




BURTON A. CLEAVES 
Assistant Professor of Music and Director of Musical Activities 



38 



Literature, 
Language, 
and the Arts 




RICHARD STERNE, 
Assistant Professor of English 




JUDITH MATLACK, 

Professor of English 




LAWRENCE LANGER. 
Instructor in English 



39 



Additional 
Faculty Members 




DINO G. VALZ, 
Lecturer on Book 
and Magazine Publishing 





ALDEN POOLE, 

Special Instructor in Journalism 



MARGARET ROWE, 
Associate Professor of 
Physical Education 



JOSEPHINE F. MILBURN, 
Instructor in Government 




40 






Q&GAHttATIOMS 



There is more to college than books and papers. 

The circles of design change direction. 

The color increases and textures develop. 

We found new experiences 

in the organizations we joined. 

We learned cooperation, 

and gained a new dimension of ourselves. 

Simmons gave us a working knowledge of people. 

The design blends into the whole, 

and the pattern nears completion. 



42 




STUDENT 

GOVERNMENT 

OFFICERS 



Lois Berman, Maxine Lavine, Betty Fox, Carol Occhiato. Tammy Olson, 

Ha Mae Schmidt, and Bobbi Lubarsky 



Student Government Organizations 



HONOR BOARD 



STUDENT GOVERN- 
MENT offers the student an 
opportunity for self-expression 
in College affairs. Sights set 
for progress and improvement, 
the Stu-G rep's horizons are 
broadened by the exchange of 
ideas with faculty, administra- 
tion and students. 

HONOR BOARD is a vital 
part of our student govern- 
ment. Its primary role is to 
educate the student to her re- 
sponsibility under an honor 
system, to strengthen and im- 
prove the system where 
needed, and to try any Honor 
Code infractions. 




Claire Caram, Judy Domina, Tammy Olson. Jean Redden. Judy Jacobson. 
Joan Millet, Marcia Leahy, Betsy Preston, Marjorie Israel, 
and Madelaine Smigliani 



43 



Class Officers 




SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS: Sandra Abrams, Roberta Abrams, 

lacqueline Denizard, ludith Eckert 



These, our class officers, are an important element 
in the total design of the Simmons community. As the 
voice of the student body, they are a vital link be- 
tween faculty and administration. Through them are 
effectively channeled our opinions and suggestions; in 
them we look for a realization of our hopes for an 
even fuller, more integrated pattern. 



44 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS: 

Mary Kelligrew, Teris Weinberger, Claire 
Tevekelian, Fay Bachner 



SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS: 
Nancy Otis, Susan Hermann 





FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS: 
Pamela Wilson, Patricia 
Smith, Barbara Whittaker 



45 



LONGWOOD HOUSE 



The Dorms 




Judie Voss and Patricia Goodwin 



DIX HALL 




Within the boundaries of Brookline 
Avenue, Pilgrim Road, and Short 
Street lies a most important section of 
Boston — the Simmons College Cam- 
pus. For four years, our paths have 
radiated from this focal point. 

The campus offers the opportunity 
for fun, relaxation and study, to make 
firm and lasting friendships, and to 
gain a perspective on daily life. 

We'll recall, sometimes with amuse- 
ment, always with nostalgia, that blood- 
curdling fire alarm shattering the mid- 
night quiet, house meetings, Gordon 
Linen, appearances before Dorm 
Board, late nights in the smoker, visits 
with our house mothers, and endless 
talks with the girls. 



HASTINGS HOUSE 




Jean Redden, Nancy Smith, and Martha Claggett 



Avis Cohen, Gail Trust, Joyce Hyman, Natalie Barnert, 
Mrs. Lash, and Myrna Mock 



46 



ARNOLD HALL 



TURNER HOUSE 





Gail Clark, Maryann Powell. Janet DeVylder, 
Mrs. Philbrick, Rose Jacobson, and Judy Domina 



Pat Campbell, Alice Woods, and Sally Dailey 



SIMMONS HALL 




Ann Webster, Pat Smith, Ros Reeves, Mrs. Chandler, Cindy Crane, Sue Fried, 
and Ruth Pritsker 



NORTH HALL 




Jeanne Ernst, Sally Paine, Doreen 
Mahoney, and Sue Boyle 



47 



SOUTH HALL 




Barbara Cohen, Miss Chrysler, Kay Bissel, 
Clara Jane Bond, and Sue Miller 



EVANS HALL 



iMI#iflfifi 




Jane Frohoch, Carol Walter, Ellen Blumsack, 

Roberta Rae 



MORSE HALL 




Laurel Trombley, Ann Van Nest, Mrs. Silver, Claire Caram, 
Jean Edelstein, and Janet Cohen 



48 




NEWS 

Debby Hurwitz, Pat Weill, Editor, 
Lynn Aston, and Janice McKelvie 



Simmons Publications 



MICROCOSM 



The staffs of NEWS and 
MICROCOSM shared in 
common a crowded office 
where chaos reigned su- 
preme, where imaginations, 
eyes and tempers were 
strained as deadlines 
neared, and where ideas 
combined with technical 
ability to produce the 
printed word. They also 
shared the satisfaction of 
knowing that in printing the 
history of Simmons they 
were providing an invalu- 
able service for the entire 
College community. 




Robin Sherwood, Gaila Keith, Editor, Penny Morgenstern, Sue Fried, Harriet 

Adler, Judy Eckert, Pat Campbell, Myrna Chaisson, Nancy Howe, Merle 

Smolker, Reggie Mitsch, and Adele Adelson 



49 



FAD 




Sue Falk, Penny Arlen, Ellen Bukanz, 
and Sue House 



RECREATION ASSOCIATION 



Brenda Bailey, Gail Parks, Noel Kring, 
and Joyce Bordeaux 




FORUM 



Audrey Chapman, Laurie Taylor, 

Irma Weiner, Jackie Denizard, 

and Adele Adelson 




50 



Cultural and 
Athletic Clubs 



NSA, FAD, and FORUM helped 
keep the world of Simmons in proper 
perspective to the larger world. The 
National Student's Association has 
been our link to other campuses and 
an active commentator on decisions 
made in that outer world affecting the 
college community. By bringing stu- 
dents in different countries closer to- 
gether, it has worked to promote inter- 
national friendship and understanding. 
FAD promoted artistic activities by 
providing the facilities for student self- 
expression, and presenting a program 
of films, art, and discussion, while Fo- 
rum's series of speakers encouraged 
greater student interest in public af- 
fairs. The Recreation Association and 
the Outing Club gave us the opportu- 
nity of achieving a happy balance be- 
tween mental and physical endeavors. 
In the program provided by the Rec- 
reation Association, we learned sports- 
manship and fair play at the local 
level. The Outing Club, a program in 
which we joined other schools in the 
area, gave us the opportunity to make 
new friends with similar interests. 



NATIONAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION 




Joan Conlin, Linda Bloom, Mary Ellen 
Chadwick, and Sue Greening 



OUTING CLUB 




Nancy Fiske. Marilyn Tomany. and Linda Jaffee 



51 




BLUETTES: Leader, Jane Frohock; back, Bunny Kensley, Peggy Forman, Ellie Lowe, 
Jean Gunn; front, Leslie Jackowitz, Dean Lilienstern, Joan Leslie, Sue Brown, 

Peggy Loeb, Adele Adelson, and Shirley Taylor. 




THE ORCHESTRA 



52 





»MK2^ ' ' 



Modern Dance Club officers: Judy Banker, 
Lois Kramer, Gwendolyn Tucker, and Pat Guy. 



Modern Dance Club holds 
an informal meeting. 



COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC 

ACTIVITIES: Elizabeth Lear, 

Joyce Hyman, Roberta Abrams, 

and Judy Voss. 




53 



Religious Clubs 



The religious clubs at Simmons — Hillel, 
I.V.C.F., Newman and Orthodox Clubs 
fulfill an important role in the lives of 
many Simmons students. Through discus- 
sion groups, lectures, social hours, and 
observance of religious holidays, students 
incorporate into their college lives the 
spiritual inspiration which will continue 
to be meaningful throughout their careers. 




INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: 
Lois Merrill, Carol Tonsing, Beverly Cornelius 




NEWMAN CLUB: Mary Ann Price, Sheila 
Murphy, Geraldine Conway, Janet 
DeVylder, Ann Solera, Barbara Griffin 



54 




HILLEL: Barbara Fair, Elaine Ginesky, 
Phyllis Gouse 




ORTHODOX CLUB: Eras Revelas 



55 




HOME ECONOMICS CLUB: Joan Emerson, Judith Pedroli, and Ann Taylor. 



School Clubs 

Vocational and social interests of 
Simmons students are combined in an 
informal atmosphere through the pro- 
fessional and school clubs. Here the girls 
are given opportunities to hear speakers 
in their field, to enjoy informal meetings 
with their instructors, and to have parties 
and coffee hours. 



ANN STRONG CLUB: Brenda 

Bailey, Phyllis Nickerson, Brenda 

Blair, and Carol Rhody. 




56 




PRINCE CLUB: Carol Sarno and 
Jane Morgan. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 

CLUB: Janet Herideen, Joan 

Leslie, Arlene Greenbaum, 

Gretchen Schaff, 

and Janet Duff. 




57 




POSTER COMMITTEE: 

Judy Edelstein and Louise Yesley 




DRAMA STEERING COMMITTEE: 

Loralee Windsor and Gladysann Rahiser 




ACADEMY: Janet Duff, Helena Adolph, Wendy Soltz, Carol Walter, Lois Merrill, Avis Cohen, Janet Tribe, Judith Domina 



58 






CAMPUS 



The impressions of our life on campus 

make the pattern more diverse. 

We learned to live with others. 

We exchanged ideas. 

We discovered the city around us, 

and made more friends outside our college circle. 

Between classes we visited the Museum of Fine Arts, 

fed ducks on the Fenway, 

heard a symphony rehearsal. 

With a little bit of luck 

we got a ticket for Camelot. 

A 11 these experiences 

filtered in and out of campus living — 

the coffee breaks, bridge hands, and conversations. 



60 




Amid the clatter of suitcases, lamps, and books, an 
incoming Freshman gets a royal welcome as she moves 
into Simmons Hall. 



President Park greets a Freshman at the President's 
Reception during Orientation Week. 




A girl entering college enters a world within a world, a student's world, and a 
new experience in independence which will include, in four years' time, as many 
experiences as there are days that pass; for each day in a student's life holds some 
unique event — an acquaintance is made, a new idea is gained from a lecture; 
there is always something quite wonderful happening or about to happen to the 
student, despite her recognition of the "mill" that is so apt to enclose her thought 
and action. 

The first week for a freshman is, perhaps, filled with the greatest number of 
experiences. Slowly she becomes a student, talks a student's language. She has a 
quick and sometimes uncertain smile for faces she has not yet come to know. 



61 



Honors Convocation 




62 




In a few weeks, the newly arrived 
student finds a new and vast world of 
study opened up for her, revealed 
through lectures, class notes, and individ- 
ual study. She learns the value of keep- 
ing physically fit, in order that she may 
fully explore her intellectual potential — 
an exploration which is to fill her aca- 
demic life with a genuine enthusiasm 
for learning. 



'But I haven't got six dollars!" 



Learning to do scientific experiments 
is an exciting part of going to class. 




A fast and furious game 
of round-robin brings an ^^HbJ 
'Oh" from Miss Olmstead. 





Between class hustle 
and bustle. 



The interval between classes is the 
time for attending to all the duties which 
cannot be done in the dorm or at home. 
Extra-curricular activities require an 
endless number of "posts" on the post 
board. Money must be deposited or, 
more urgently, withdrawn from the 
comptroller's office. A topic must be 
okayed by a professor, or the class bul- 
letin boards checked in regard to future 
plans. 




The post board, a tradition, is an old but 
lasting means of communication. 



64 




After Simmons . . . what? 



"««- DULLER 




There's an endless run on 
the Simmons bank. 



65 




An in-between class cap nap. 




Last minute cram before a quiz. 




The lounge is a comfortable refuge for reviewing notes. 



66 




World problems are often solved during lunch hours in the caf. 




Mmmmmmmm! 




Coffee, cokes, books, and cigarettes — all 
part of late afternoon in the caf. 



67 




A cure for every ill. 




"Stick out your tongue, please/ 



A familiar face at Simmons. 




As due dates for papers and exams 
approach, the student stays up late, and 
a constant stream of girls wend their way 
to the health office for a sympathetic 
smile and a pill. A few doors down, the 
Stu-G office buzzes with activity. Fre- 
quently student affairs necessitate a long 
day, and at eight-thirty p.m. on Tuesday 
and Thursday evenings, it is reassuring to 
hear the friendly step of the janitor in an 
otherwise silent building. Not all days are 
long ones, however. Frequently there is 
time for a walk through the Fenway, or a 
quick trip to look at the flowers in the 
Gardner museum, before turning home- 
ward. 



68 





The Stu-G Office, a beehive of activity. 



:,. ; ; - 




Homeward bound. 




The best friend of the Fenway duck, 

a Simmons girl whose pockets bulge with 

stale bread or a left-over sandwich. 



69 



Fi I '■■ fe 




The class of '61 may never attend 
classes in the new building or study in 
the new library, but this is the way they 
will remember it — drilling during finals, 
friendly workmen, glimpses of half-fin- 
ished rooms, piles of lumber and concrete. 

Everyone at Simmons, watching the 
buildings grow, has been aware of the 
new milestone being reached in Sim- 
mons' history. 




70 






71 




A card for every occasion. 




m 



V- 



By late afternoon, the 
traffic on Brookline Ave- 
nue increases, and the pace 
of Simmons life slows 
down. Time is found for 
the little things — buying a 
birthday card, making a 
call home, or chatting with 
a friend. 




"I'm sorry, she's not back from class yet.' 



72 




Afternoons in the dorm — a time to relax. 




Humor in the hallway. 



"ii'im»'!!;:v:" 



A snack at Yueh's. 




73 



^JtzM/' 





"Sandwiches and milk!" 



Sing along with Norma. 





'Eight no trump.' 



Dishrag rumba. 



74 




'Ketchup, relish, or both?" 



A visit to Howie's and 
Yueh's, bridge and singing 
around the piano, cooking 
in the kitchenette, and buy- 
ing a snack from the sand- 
wich girl — ways for every- 
one to relax and ease 
school tension. 




Confucius say: "Spaghetti better than hamburger." 



75 




"Let's cut everybody off and 
start over again." 




Nine-thirty study break 
around the piano. 




A Simmons first — election night seen 
on the dorm televisions. 




The best study break of all. 



When the studying's done, 
there's always TV. 




76 




When dorm board meets, the punishment 
fits the crime. 



Evenings 
In The Dorm 




Someone's about to be surprised. 




Keeping in touch back home. 



77 




Skit Night, '58 



Skit Night, a fun tradition, sparks an 
enthusiastic participation of dorm stu- 
dents in friendly competition. 

Writing, rehearsing, and sewing cos- 
tumes evokes a spirit of comradeship 
among budding talents. 

And, finally, after the excitement is 
over, there are screams of delight when 
the trophy is won! 



"Which way the world," the theme of Dix 
Hall's skit. 



The Mistresses of Ceremony 
provided punch. 





The winner is 




Song Fest 



South Hall singing "Bali Hai.' 



Lusty singing, along with more gentle 
tones, may be heard in Alumnae Hall 
during Song Fest. 

This year the popular new campus 
competition highlighted songs from Rog- 
ers and Hammerstein productions, color- 
fully and enthusiastically performed by 
dorm songstresses. 



Longwood's "Honey Bun" was a big hit, too. 




79 




A snip in time 




It's cartoon time at the movies. 




"What did you say his last name is?" 



"Hurry up, we're starved.' 

■ 1^ 




80 




Invasion! 



Shall we dance? 



Fun 

Around Boston 




For Ihe best in jazz . 




It's bigger than both of us. 





Morse Hall's winning door decoration. 



Winter Weekends 




Snow bunnies ready for fun in 
the snow. 




Fun around the fireplace on a snowy day. 



82 




Simmons Hall becomes a coffee house 
during Winter Weekend. 



Where's Santa? 




A modern Pied Piper. 





King, Maxine Lavine, 
clears the way 
for the tradi- 
tional boar's head. 



Olde English Dinner 




The Royal Court is comprised of Student Government Association Officers. 



84 




President Park proves that there is an art to 
carving a turkey. 



"* 



OLDE ENGLISH DINNER— and 

Bartol Hall becomes a medieval manor. 
From the first sip of egg nog, a holiday 
mood prevails. The Simmons royalty, 
filled with the spirit of Christmas, offer 
a gala feast to the seniors and faculty. 
A magic spell is cast by savory turkey 
(as much as we can eat), elegant cos- 
tumes, carols, and an amazing pageant 
in which the bold Saint George slays the 
fearsome dragon. Too soon, the dinner 
is a memory, but if lucky, we are able 
to carry off a drumstick as a souvenir. 




Court musicians provide atmosphere at the gala celebration. 



Ye olde jester makes merry 
with the King. 




85 




Spring Spree 



Spring Spree is Simmons' field day. Miracu- 
lously, the back yard is transformed into a bus- 
tling market place. Bright-colored signs and ban- 
ners greet the eye, the aroma of fresh roasted 
hot dogs wafts on the air tempting the appetite, 
and a medley of barker's voices proclaiming their 
wares, tempts the pocketbook. It's a day when 
faculty and students can roll up their sleeves, for- 
get the classroom and compete with each other 
at ringtoss, bid against each other at the auction 
and join in a day of delightful diversion. 



Sheik Stephen Deane with a member of his harem. 




Mr. Shepro, Spring Spree auctioneer. 



86 



Sophs and seniors join in the traditional 

crowning of the Queen at Strawberry Breakfast. 

A drowsy court looks on . . . the hour? 6 a.m. 



.- ■ 





A lively maypole dance heightens the 
appetites of both dancers and spectators. 



May Breakfast 



Twice in her college career the Simmons girl gets 
up to greet the sunrise — once as a sophomore and 
again as a senior. Visions of luscious strawberry short- 
cake topped with a mountain of whipped cream over- 
come her drowsiness, and she is out-of-doors at 6:00! 

With much pomp and ceremony the campus queen 
is crowned. The crisp morning air only whets the ap- 
petites of the spectators, and at last, they follow the 
royal entourage in to a breakfast that will long be re- 
membered. 



At last . . the strawberry 
shortcake! 




87 










SENIORS 



The finished design, 
composed of all the fragments the microcosm 

has given the graduate, 

must now stand the test of the macrocosm, 

which in its diversity and vastness 

challenges the individual. 

But the young woman, complex and flexible, 

by altering and subtly remoulding 

the completed design Simmons has given her, 

will be prepared to meet future decisions 

with confidence. 



89 



**s%#|; 








ROBERTA LEE ABRAMS 
Science 



SANDRA REVA ABRAMS 
Education 




ADELE SUSAN ADELSON 
Publication 





HARRIET PEARL ADLER 

Publication 



HELENA R. ADOLPH 
Education 



91 




CAROLE ANNE AHERNE 
Education 





BETTY NEARY ALBERTS 

Social Science 



TANYA P. ALEXANDER 

Education 





JOAN H. ALGER 

Social Science 



NAOMI S. ALPEREN 
Social Science 



92 




TANYA CARYL ANNIS 
Science 





JUDITH RACHEL ARONS 

Science 



LORA HURWITCH BAGAN 
Social Science 





SALLY A. BALL 

Library Science 



JUDITH GALNER BANKER 

Education 



93 





NATALIE JANE BARNERT 
Education 



CAROL MARY BEDFORD 

Nursing 





MARCIA CLAYTON BEHLE 

Publication 



KATHLEEN DEMETRIN BEKAS 
Social Science 




94 



CONSTANCE E. BENNETT 
Education 




CHRISTINE ELIZABETH 
BERGFALK 

Social Science 




PENELOPE SUE BEYLAND 
Home Economics 




o 


wL^lj^ W 


"V,.- 


/ 



LOIS HARRIET BERMAN 
Science 




KAY MINER BISSELL 

Education 



JOAN SILBERT BLAKE 
Science 



95 





LINDA BLOOM 

Education 




ELIZABETH BOUMIL 
Science 




SUSAN BOYLE 
Publication 




NANCY LOUISE BRADLEY 
Business 



^% 



CAROLYN FAITH BROKVIST 
Nursing 

96 




JUDITH FLORENCE BROSSUS 

Home Economics 





PATRICIA SUE CAMPBELL 

Publication 



CLAIRE C. CARAM 
Science 





VILIJA MARIJA CEPAS 

Home Economics 



ROBERTA JANICE CHIN 
Home Economics 



97 





MARTHA CLAGGETT 

Library Science 



GAIL PALMER CLARK 
Business 





JOAN MUNTON COHEE 
Retailing 



AVIS RHODA COHEN 

Home Economics 




98 



CAROL ROSENFELD COHEN 

Social Science 



^m 




JANET B. COHEN 
Business 





JUDITH SUZANNE COHEN 
Library Science 



LINDA KOPANS COPEN 
Education 





y 



BEVERLY ROSE CORNELIUS 

Science 



ROBIN CAROL CRAM 

Social Science 



99 





-.T~- 



BETTY MAE CROCK 

Social Science 



BARBARA ANNE CROUT 
Social Science 




ANN BURR CZEPIEL 
Social Science 





SARA JANE DAILEY 
Education 



CAROL ANNE DAISY 
Nursing 

100 





CAROL ANN DAVENPORT 
Science 




MARIANNE JOAN DEBLOIS 
Social Science 



BARBARA ANN BARNAT 
DEFRUSCIO 

Science 





JOAN E. DELAURA 
Business 



JACQUELINE DENIZARD 
Business 



101 





ESTELLE MARY DEVLIN 

Nursing 



LOIS MARILYN DIAMOND 
Home Economics 





CELIA MARCIA DIEMONT 

Education 




GAIL ANN DITMARS 

Nursing 



102 



IUDITH FARWELL DOMINA 
Science 





MADELEINE GILBERT 
DRUCKER 

Education 



IANET LOUISE DUFF 
Science 




DONNA C. EASTMAN 
Publication 





JUDITH HORKHEIMER ECKERT 

Publications 



JEAN REVA EDELSTEIN 

Social Science 



103 




JUDITH LISSACK EDELSTEIN 
Social Science 




SALLY REID ELDRIDGE 
Home Economics 




GUNTA ELMUTS 
Science 





SUSAN BETH ELSO 
Science 



JOAN EMERSON 
Home Economics 



104 




JEANNE ADAMS ERNST 
Social Science 





SUSAN RUSSIAN FAIGEL 
Social Science 



ARLENE WEINER FEINGOLD 

Science 





JANET MARY FERGUSON 

Nursing 



FVELYN RUTH FESSELL 

Education 



105 





FRANCES BRENDA FIELDS 

Nursing 



MAXINE RITA FIRESTONE 

Social Science 





JANE VOGEL FISCHMAN 

Education 




NORMA PHYLIS FISHER 

Social Science 



106 



JUDITH ANNE FITZGERALD 
Science 





JILL FORMAN 
Business 



BETTY FOX 

Business 




BARBARA TANNENBAUM 

FRANK 

Education 





SUSAN MARIE FRIED 
Publication 



ROCHELLE SOL1N FRIEDMAN 

Education 



107 




MARJORIE E. FROST 

Science 





JUDITH FUHRMANN 
Business 



THELMA BETH GALKIN 
Science 





MARION JUDITH GEBER 

Retailing 

108 



JOAN GAULT 
Retailing 




f 




NAOMI WOLIN GERSH 
Education 





PRISCILLA OLMSTEAD GOMAN 
Social Science 



ELIZABETH ANNE WEBBER 
GOODALE 

Social Science 





DEENA GORDON 
Social Science 



PHYLLIS EDELE GOUSE 

Social Science 



109 




BARBARA GRIFFIN 

Business 





MARTHA HYNDMAN GRAY 
Nursing 




HAZEL GRIME 

Social Science 




MARIETTA GRYGENT 

Business 



110 



MARJORIE GUSTAFSON 
Home Economics 





PATRICIA ANN GUY 
Science 




LINDA HAYES H ANN EM AN 
Home Economics 




MILDRED RUTH HARRIS 

Nursing 



SARAH ANNE HALEY 
Nursing 




JUNE FRANCES HARRIGAN 
Science 



111 





SHIRLEY SCHOLNICK HARRIS 

Social Science 




JACQUELINE MAHONEY 

HEBERL 

Business 



JANET JUDITH HERIDEEN 

Science 





MARILYN ELIZABETH 
HOFFMAN 

Science 



CAROL WARE HOMILLER 

Library Science 



112 





M 



EVA HOROWITZ 

Social Science 




SUSAN HOUSE 
Education 



ELIZABETH HOWELL 

Home Economics 





BRITTA EILEEN HURLEY 

Nursing 



IOYCE DIANE HYMAN 
Social Science 



113 





JUDITH ANN JACOBSON 
Business 



HARRIET STALLINGS JAROSH 

Library Science 





PATRICIA LIBLEY KAMENS 
Home Economics 




GAILA PATWELL KEITH 

Publication 



NAOMI RUTH KIRSCHENBAUM 
Social Science 



114 



t^^^^mm 





FREDDA KRAMER 

Social Science 



LOIS JANE KRAMER 
Library Science 




JUDITH MARGOLIN KRIGER 

Social Science 





LYNDA ROSE LAKIN 
Science 



CYNTHIA LANCE 

Education 



115 





MARSHA NAOMI LANDSMAN 
Education 



ADELENE JOAN LANG 

Education 




JUNE EVELYN LARSON 

Education 





««y 



MAXINE PHOEBE LAVINE 
Science 



ELIZABETH DIANE LAZAR 
Retailing 
116 





ELIZABETH H. LEAR 
Social Science 




LOUISE LEVISON 
Social Science 



ABBY JOYCE LEVITT 

Science 





LOIS ANN L1EBMAN 
Retailing 



JUDITH LOBER 

Publication 



117 





NORMA RUTH LOVIT 
Science 



ROBERTA LOIS LUBARSKY 

Publication 





FRANCES J. LUBIN 
Social Science 




ANN LUFKIN 
Social Science 



118 



SANDRA L. MacIVER 
Home Economics 



^ 




AMY ROSALAND MATZ 
Social Science 




PATTI C. McWILLIAMS 

Nursing 





JANICE MAY McKELVIE 

Publication 




SANDRA MERKIN 

Nursing 



LOIS LEE MERRILL 

Home Economics 



119 




'-■..:. 




THALIA METALIDES 
Home Economics 




JAQUELINE MICHEL 

Social Science 



SUSAN JANE MILLER 
Business 





AGNES FRANCES MIMNO 
Publication 



MARY REGINA MITSCH 

Social Science 
120 



^H 




s* 



EDITH MOK 

Business 





JANE ELLEN MORGAN 

Retailing 



PENELOPE H. MORGENSTERN 

Publication 





GRACE ANN MORSE 
Home Economics 



ELIZABETH AGNES MORIN 
Education 



121 




--.-... 




MARIA THERESIA NIEBERLE 

Nursing 



KATHERINE NORRIS 

Retailing 





HADELE FAY NYMAN 
Business 




CAROLE M. OCCHIATO 

Business 



122 



BERYL DEAN OLSON 
Science 





CHARLOTTE A. OTTERSON 

Nursing 




GAIL E. PARKS 

Home Economics 




SARAH LANSING PAINE 
Publication 




FLORENCE HARDING PARSONS 
Business 



JONELLE E. PARSONS 

Library Science 



123 




JUDITH ANN PEDROLI 
Home Economics 




DIANNE PERROTTA 
Science 





ELIZABETH KIMBALL 

PENNELL 

Business 




MARYANNE HIGGINS POWELL 

Business 



RUTH S. PUDOLSKY 

Nursing 



124 





\ 




MARILYN IRIS RADBORD 

Home Economics 




ROBERTA ELEANOR RAE 

Retailing 



GLADYSANN SIMMONDS 
RAHISER 

Business 




ROSALIND A. REEVES 
Education 




JEAN ELLEN REDDEN 
Social Science 



125 





CAROL ANN RENNIE 
Retailing 



IRMA KASS RESNIC 
Business 





VIVIAN EDNA RESNICK 

Science 



ADELE LOUISE RICE 

Nursing 




126 



SUSAN F. RICHMAN 
Social Science 




BARBARA BRENDA ROBBINS 

Science 



JUDITH LEANORE 
ROSEN BLOOM 

Library Science 





CHRISTINE MARIE RODRIGUES 

Nursing 





JUDITH PAULA ROSENFIELD 
Business 



MIRIAM H. ROSOFF 

Science 



127 




LOIS ELIZABETH ROTHENBERG 

Education 





DEBORAH RUBIN 
Library Science 



CLAIRE BERNICE RUBIN 

Social Science 





DIANE MILLER SAMUELSON 
Business 



LAURA ROSE SANDI 
Business 



128 




CAROL ANN SARNO 
Retailing 





GRETCHEN SCHAFF 

Science 



CAROL ANN SCHLAFMAN 
Education 





ILA MAE SCHMIDT 

Home Economics 



JUDITH RUTH SCHWARTZ 

Social Science 



129 





ROSALIND SEIDENSTEIN 
Science 



ABIGAIL DICKSON SENKLER 
Home Economics 





MARIANNE SEVERANCE 
Business 




BEVERLY DOREEN SEYMON 
Retailing 



130 



HEATHER RENEE SHAIN 
Education 




JOANNE SHEPARD 
Retailing 




ROBIN SHERWOOD 

Publication 




JULIE PHILLIPS SIBLEY 

Publication 





JOAN ROTMAN SIDMAN 

Education 



LINDA DARR SLOANE 

Education 



131 



^§£i 




PATRICIA ANN SMITH 

Science 




WENDY JOAN SOLTZ 
Education 





LOUISE RITA SNEIDMAN 

Home Economics 




GAIL SAPERSTEIN STEIN 
Education 



NANCY STERN 
Social Science 



132 




NAOMI LEE STILES 
Nursing 





ELIZABETH ANNE ST. ONGE 
Home Economics 



IEAN ELLEN STROUSE 
Social Science 





BARBARA S. SUHER 

Education 



SUSAN KEITH SWASEY 
Business 



133 





MARY FRANCES TANCRETI 
Home Economics 



ANN TAYLOR 
Home Economics 





ARLENE I. TITCHELL 
Education 




JANET BARBARA TRIBE 
Home Economics 



134 



JUDITH SWEET VOSS 
Science 




CAROL ANN WALTER 
Home Economics 





DOROTHEA SINKO WATRIN 

Social Science 



X 



PATRICIA GENE WEILL 

Publication 






IRMA Z. WIENER 

Science 



MARY GERTRUDE WELCH 

Retailing 



SANDRA ANN WEST 
Science 

135 




SUSAN WINTER 
Social Science 





JANICE M. WOODMAN 
Nursing 




ALICE MARY WOODS 

Science 



JUNE YAMAUCHI 
Library Science 





LOUISE S. YESLEY 
Social Science 



136 



ANN RUTH ZIGELBAUM 
Business 



"Farewell to you and the youth I have 
spent with you. 

It was but yesterday we met in a dream. 

You have sung to me in my aloneness, 
and I of your longings have built a tower 
in the sky. 

But now our sleep has fled and our dream 
is over, and it is no longer dawn. 

The noontide is upon us and our half 
waking has turned to fuller day, and we 
must part. 

If in the twilight of memory we should 
meet once more, we shall speak again together 
and you shall sing to me a deeper song. 

And if our hands should meet in another 
dream we shall build another tower in the sky." 



137 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



ABRAMS, Roberta Lee — Science; 1897 Stanley Street. New 
Britain, Connecticut; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; Dorm Representative 
3; Treasurer of Forum 3; Treasurer of Senior Class; Committee 
on Academic Activities 4. 

ABRAMS, Sandra Reva — Education; 45 Adanac Road, Milton, 
Massachusetts; Commuter Representative to Student Govern- 
ment 1, 3; Sophomore Luncheon Chairman; Spring Spree 
Booth Committee; President of Senior Class. 

ADELSON, Adele Susan — Publication; 9 Grace Street, Lowell, 
Massachusetts; Co-Chairman of Sophomore Luncheon Decor- 
ations; Class Song Leader 3; Head Caroller, Olde English Din- 
ner 3; Associate Art Editor of MIC 3; Representative to 
Forum 4; Class Executive Board 4; Co-Art Editor of MIC 4; 
Bluettes 2, 3, 4. 

ADLER, Harriet Pearl — Publication; 586 Moorhead Place, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Sock 'n Buskin 1. 2; Co-Chairman 
of Spring Spree Programs 3; Secretary of MIC 4. 

ADOLPH, Helena R. — Education; 306 Riverway, Boston, 
Massachusetts; Glee Club 1; Compets 1; Academy 3, 4; NEWS 
Reviewer 3, 4. 

AHERNE, Carole Anne — Education; 32 Woodard Road, West 
Roxbury, Massachusetts; Newman Club. 

ALBERTS, Betty Neary — Social Science; Paia, Maui, Hawaii; 
Treasurer of Class 1, 2; Modern Dance Club 1, 2, 3; Chairman 
of Social Activities of Appleton House 2; Honor Board Rep- 
resentative 3; Chairman of Flowers for lunior Prom; Volun- 
teer Service 3; Co-Chairman of Senior Week 4. 

ALEXANDER, Tanya P.— Education; 22619 Main Street, 
Armada, Michigan; Modern Dance Club; Sock 'n Buskin; 
Editor of ICARUS; Activities Chairman of French Club. 

ALGER, Joan H. — Social Science; 70 Webster Road, Brain- 
tree, Massachusetts; Transfer from the University of Massa- 
chusetts; Floor Representative of Simmons Hall 2; Simmons 
Hall Co-Chairman of Skit Night 2; Olde English Dinner 3; 
Cotillion 3; Chairman of Daisy Chain 3. 

ALPEREN, Naomi S.— Social Science; 210 College Street, 
Lewiston, Maine; Social Activities Chairman of Longwood 
House 2; FAD 4. 

ANNIS, Tanya Caryl — Science; 253 Gibson Street, Lowell, 
Massachusetts; Officer of Hillel. 

ARONS, Judith Rachel— Science; 2236 Edgerton Road, Uni- 
versity Heights, Ohio. 

BAGAN, Lora Hurwitch — Social Science; 69 Park Drive, 
Boston, Massachusetts; Sock 'n Buskin 2; Secretary of Forum 
3; NEWS 3; Chairman of Publicity for Strawberry Breakfast 3. 

BALL, Sally A. — Library Science; 1 Payson Street, Lexington, 
Massachusetts. 



BEKAS, Kathleen Demetrin — Social Science; 6 Southview 
Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3; 
Outing Club 2, 3. 

BENNETT, Constance E. — Education; 646 Sumner Avenue, 
Springfield. Massachusetts; Campus Guide 2; President of 
French Club 3; Student Assistant and House Counselor of 
Pilgrim House 4. 

BERGFALK, Christine Elizabeth — Social Science; 45-51 Zion 
Street, Little Neck, New York; Transfer from Lasell Junior 
College; Treasurer of Evans Hall 3; Student Government Rep- 
resentative of Evans Hall 4. 

BERMAN, Lois Harriet — Science; 144 East 30th Street, Pater- 
son, New Jersey; Athletic Association 1; Class Executive Board 
3; Chairman of Junior Class Supper; Campus Guide 3; House 
Counselor of Morse Hall 3; Photography Editor of MIC 4; 
Second Vice-President of Student Government 4. 

BEYLAND, Penelope Sue — Home Economics; 79 Markham 
Place, Little Silver, New Jersey; Glee Club 1, 2. 3; Sophomore 
Prom Committee; Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Junior Wel- 
come Committee; Vice-President of Arnold Hall 4. 

BISSELL, Kay Miner — Education; Coventry, Connecticut; 
NEWS Advertising Staff 1; Circulation Editor 2; Sock 'n Bus- 
kin 1, 2; Campus Guide 2; Secretary of Evans Hall 2; Floor 
Representative of South Hall 3; Campus Fire Chief 4; Student 
Assistant to Mrs. Cartwright 4. 

BLAKE, Joan Silbert — Science; 648 Morton Street, Mattapan, 
Massachusetts; Hillel; Sophomore Luncheon Committee; Junior 
Welcome Committee. 

BLOOM, Linda— Education: 1050 Harding Road, Elizabeth, 
New Jersey; Transfer from the University of Michigan; House 
Counselor of Simmons Hall 3; Campus Guide 3; NSA Del- 
egate 4. 

BOUMIL, Elizabeth — Science; 3 Sherman Street, North 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts; Newman Club; Outing Club. 

BOYLE, Susan — Publication; 114 Lawn Terrace, Mamaroneck, 
New York; Secretary of North Hall 2; Simmons Handbook 
Staff 3; Executive Board 4; House Counselor of North Hall 4; 
Co-Chairman of Publicity for Olde English Dinner 4. 

BRADLEY, Nancy Louise — Business; Ashuelot Street, West 
Swanzey, New Hampshire. 

BROKVIST, Carolyn Faith— Nursing; 80 Mt. Vernon Street, 
West Roxbury, Massachusetts; Anne Strong Club; Christian 
Association; Campus Guide. 

BROSSUS, Judith Florence— Home Economics; 414 E. Gen- 
esee Street, Fayetteville, New York; Transfer Welcome Com- 
mittee 2; Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 4. 



BANKER, Judith Gainer — Education; 1 Langdon Street, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts; Modern Dance Club 1, 2, 3; President 

4. 

BARNERT, Natalie Jane — Education; 40 Collamore Terrace, 
West Orange, New Jersey; President of Dix Hall; President of 
Longwood House. 

BEDFORD, Carol Mary— Nursing; R.D. #1, Wild Cat Hill 
Road, Thomaston, Connecticut; Vice-President of Anne Strong 
Club; Social Activities Chairman of Simmons Hall 3. 



CAMPBELL, Patricia Sue — Publication; 102 Valley Road, 
Glen Rock, New Jersey; Executive Board 1, 3; FAD 2, 3; 
Chairman of Films; Junior Welcome Committee; Chairman 
of Entertainment for Junior Prom; Technical Editor of MIC 
4; Student Assistant of Turner House 4. 

CAR AM, Claire C. — Science; 106 Ames Street, Lawrence. 
Massachusetts; Transfer from Merrimak College; Newman 
Club 2; Tennis Club 2; Campus Guide 3; House Counselor 
of Evans Hall 3; Student Assistant of Morse Hall 4; Senior 
Honor Board Representative. 



BEHLE, Marcia Clayton— Publication; 991 South 12th East, 
Salt Lake City, Utah; Christian Association; Inter-Varsity 
Christian Fellowship. 



CEPAS, Vilija Marija — Home Economics; 265 Beaver Street, 
Waltham, Massachusetts; Home Economics Club; Newman 
Club. 



138 



CHIN, Roberta Janice — Home Economics; 18 Tyler Street, 
Boston, Massachusetts; Freshman Office Staff; Class Executive 
Board; Honor Board Representative; Fund Drive; Junior Wel- 
come Committee; Class Representative; Vice-President of 
Newman Club. 

CLAGGETT, Martha— Library Science; 29 Park Street, New- 
port, New Hampshire; President of Hastings House 4; Librar- 
ian of Glee Club. 

CLARK, Gail Palmer — Business; Carrington Lane, Farming- 
ton, Connecticut; Floor Representative to Arnold Hall Dorm 
Board 3; House Counselor of Arnold Hall 4. 

COHEE, Joan Munton — Retailing; 9 Terrace Drive, Wor- 
cester, Massachusetts; President of Appleton House 3; Chair- 
man of Junior Prom; Junior Welcome Steering Committee; 
Vice-President of Prince Club 4; Curriculum Evaluation Com- 
mittee 4. 

COHEN, Avis Rhoda — Home Economics; 13 Andrews Ter- 
race, Woonsocket, Rhode Island; Executive Board 1; Hillel 1; 
NEWS Business Staff 1; Social Activities Representative 2; 
Co-Chairman of Christmas Cotillion 2; Fire Captain of Long- 
wood House 2; Student Government Representative 3; Acad- 
emy 3, 4; House Counselor of Dix Hall 4. 



DAVENPORT, Carol Ann — Science; Broadway, Bangor 
Maine; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Social Activities Chairman of 
Newman Club 3. 

DEBLOIS, Marianne Joan — Social Science; 59 Oak Street, 
Clinton, Massachusetts; Co-Chairman of Invitation Committee 
of Sophomore Prom; Newman Club 3, 4; Commuter Organiza- 
tion. 

DEFRUSCIO, Barbara Ann Barnat— Science; 5 Hillside Ave- 
nue, Salem Depot, New Hampshire; Newman Club; Ellen 
Richards Club; Academy. 



DELAURA, Joan E.- 
ton, Connecticut. 



-Business; 22 Country Club Road, Gro- 



DEN IZARD, Jacqueline — Business; Bourdon, Port-au-Prince, 
Haiti; Newman Club I, 2; Glee Club 2, 3; Executive Board 3; 
Secretary of Senior Class; Vice-President of Forum 4. 

DEVLIN. Estelle Mary — Nursing; 5 Hill Street, Stoneham, 
Massachusetts; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Anne Strong Club 

2, 3. 

DIAMOND, Lois Marilyn — Home Economics; 17 North 22nd 
Street, Pottsville, Pennsylvania; Transfer from Pennsylvania 
State University; Home Economics Club. 



COHEN, Carol Ann Rosenfeld — Social Science; 82 Guy 
Street, Brookline, Massachusetts; Modern Dance Club. 



DIEMONT. Celia Marcia — Education; 228 Winchester Street, 
Brookline 46. Massachusetts; NEWS: Student Government. 



COHEN, Janet B. — Business; 204 Waverly Avenue, East Rock- 
away, New York; Orchestra 3, 4; Floor Representative of 
Morse Hall 3; House Counselor of Morse Hall 4; Business 
Manager of NEWS 4. 

COHEN, Judith Suzanne — Library Science; 4 Victoria Road, 
Portland, Connecticut; Secretary of Orchestra 3; President of 
Orchestra 4. 

COPEN, Linda Kopans — Education; 257 South Street, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts; N.F.T.Y. Alumnae Group 1; Glee Club 
4; Soloist 3. 

CORNELIUS, Beverly Rose— Science; 860 Bellevue Avenue, 
Sheridan, Wyoming; President of Inter-Varsity Christian Fel- 
lowship. 

CRAM, Robin Carol — Social Science; 1 1 Arrowhead Trail, 
Fairborn, Ohio; Sock 'n Buskin 1; Booth Chairman for Spring 
Spree 1; Prom Committee 2; Anne Strong Club 2, 3; Fire Cap- 
tain of North Hall 3; Transfer Welcome Committee 3; Student 
Government Representative of Hastings House 4; International 
Relations Club 4. 

CROCK, Betty Mae — Social Science; 95 Burns Street, New 
Bedford, Massachusetts; Hillel 1, 2; NEWS Circulation 1, 2, 3; 
Transfer Welcome Committee 3; Social Activities Chairman 
of Morse Hall 4. 



DITMARS, Gail Ann— Nursing; 402 Grove Street, Needham, 
Massachusetts; Outing Club; Synchronized Swim Club; Anne 
Strong Club. 

DOMINA, Judith Farwell — Science; 118 Meadow Street, 
North Amherst, Massachusetts; Campus Guide 2, 3; Academy 
3; President 4; Physical Therapy Club 2, 3, 4; Vice-President 
3; Honor Board Representative 4; Student Assistant of Arnold 
Hall 4. 

DRUCKER, Madeleine Gilbert— Education; 32 Mason Ter- 
race, Brookline, Massachusetts; Hillel 1; Freshman Represen- 
tative 1; Modern Dance Club 2, 3, 4; Dorm Officer 2; Vice- 
President of Forum 3. 

DUFF, Janet Louise — Science; 37 Nelson Street, Webster, 
Massachusetts; Physical Therapy Club; Secretary, Treasurer 
3, 4; Academy 3; Secretary, Treasurer 4. 

EASTMAN, Donna C. — Publication; 282 Main Street, Frank- 
lin, Massachusetts; Social Relations 1; MIC Staff 3; Poster 
Club 3. 

ECKERT, Judith Horkheimer — Publications; 215 Larchmont 
Avenue, Larchmont. New York; Chairman of Freshman Prom; 
NEWS Art Staff; Chairman of Simmons Afternoon at Pops; 
Secretary of Junior Class; Honor Board Representative 3; Vice- 
President of Senior Class; Co-Art Editor of MIC. 



CROUT, Barbara Anne — Social Science; 5 Pinewood Road, 
Lexington, Massachusetts; NSA Representative 1, 2, 3; Execu- 
tive Board 1, 2, 3; Sock 'n Buskin 1, 2; Christmas Cotillion 
Committee 1, 2; Spring Spree Committee 2; Campus Guide 3; 
Song Leader of South Hall 4; Glee Club 1, 2. 

CZEPIEL, Ann Burr — Social Science; 102 Adelaide Road, 
Manchester, Connecticut; Secretary-Treasurer of Hastings 
House 1; Publicity Co-Chairman of Christian Association 1; 
Anne Strong Club 2; Floor Proctor of Evans Hall 3; Vice- 
President of Evans Hall 4. 

DAILEY, Sara Jane — Education; 3 West Street, Milford, Mass- 
achusetts; Newman Club 1; Secretary 2; President 3; House 
Counselor of Turner House 4. 

DAISY, Carol Anne — Nursing; Benson Road, Truro, Mass- 
achusetts; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Anne Strong Club 2, 3, 4; 
Bluettes 3; Song Leader of Simmons Hall 3; Junior Welcome 
Committee. 



EDELSTEIN, Jean Reva — Social Science; 1822 9th Avenue 
East, Hibbing, Minnesota; Compets 1; Campus Guide 2; Soc- 
ial Activities Chairman of Morse Hall 3; House Counselor of 
Morse Hall 4. 

EDELSTEIN, Judith Lissack— Social Science; 22 Medfield 
Street, Boston, Massachusetts; Campus Guide 2, 3; Co-Chair- 
man of Decorations for Sophomore Luncheon; Junior Welcome 
Committee; Floor Representative of Dix Hall 3; Poster Com- 
mittee; Treasurer 3; Chairman 4. 

ELDRIDGE, Sally Reid — Home Economics; Birchronville, 
Pennsylvania; President of Christian Science Organization. 

ELMUTS, Gunta— Science; 27 Boylston Street. Jamaica Plain, 
Massachusetts. 

ELSO, Susan Beth— Science; 38 Chestnut Street. Belmont, 
Massachusetts; Co-Chairman of Publicity Committee for 
Spring Spree 3; Co-Chairman of Cap and Gown Committee 3. 



139 



EMERSON, Joan — Home Economics; 28702 Holly Drive, 
North Olmsted, Ohio; Transfer from Bowling Green State Uni- 
versity; Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Social Activities Chair- 
man of Hastings House 2; Dorm Board for Small Houses 2; 
Student Dietitian in Bartol Hall 3, 4. 

ERNST, Jeanne Adams — Social Science; 14 South Chestnut 
Street, Augusta, Maine; Dorm Board in North Hall 1; Prince 
Club 2; Daisy Chain 3; Usher 3; Dorm Board in Evans Hall 
3; House Counselor of North Hall 4. 

FAIGEL, Susan Russian — Social Science; 26 Evans Way, Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts; Glee Club 1; Chairman of Spring Spree in 
Longwood House 1; Bluettes 3; Song Leader of Dix Hall 3. 

FEINGOLD, Arlene Weiner— Science; 23 Gordon Street, Mai- 
den, Massachusetts; Hillel 1; Campus Guide 2; Co-Chairman 
of Publicity for Freshman-Sophomore Valentine Party 2; Phys- 
ical Therapy Club 2, 3, 4. 

FERGUSON, Janet Mary — Nursing; 80 Pinehurst Street, Ros- 
lindale, Massachusetts. 

FESSELL, Evelyn Ruth — Education; 142 Lancaster Street, 
Providence 6, Rhode Island; Hillel; NEWS Staff; Campus 
Guide. 

FIELDS, Frances Brenda — Nursing; 85 Stenton Road, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts; Junior Welcome Steering Committee; NSA 
Travel Director 3. 

FIRESTONE, Maxine Rita — Social Science; 101 Montclair 
Drive, West Hartford, Connecticut; Hillel 1, 2; NEWS 2. 

FISCHMAN, Jane Vogel — Education; 65 Park Drive, Boston, 
Massachusetts; Sock 'n Buskin 1, 2; Secretary 3; Hillel 1, 2, 3; 
Transfer Welcome Committee 2; Junior Welcome Steering 
Committee; Executive Board 4; Co-Chairman of Olde English 
Dinner. 

FISHER, Norma Phyllis — Social Science; 27 Englewood Ave- 
nue, Brookline, Massachusetts; Transfer Welcome Committee. 

FITZGERALD, Judith Anne— Science; 44 Hollis Street, Mil- 
ton, Massachusetts; Newman Club; Junior Welcome Commit- 
tee. 

FORMAN. Jill — Business; 757 Elmgrove Avenue. Providence, 
Rhode Island; Transfer from Pembroke College. 

FOX, Betty — Business; 81 Garfield Avenue, Sayville, Long 
Island, New York; Circulation Staff for NEWS 1, 2, 3; Soprf- 
omore Executive Board; Sophomore Workshop; Placement 
Commission 2, 3; Vice-President of Dix Hall 3; Junior Wel- 
come Steering Committee; First Vice-President of Student 
Government 4; Senior Prom Chairman 4. 

FRANK, Barbara Tannenbaum — Education; 97 Marion Street, 
Brookline, Massachusetts. 

FRIED. Susan Marie — Publication; 42-15 147 Street. Flushing, 
New York; Circulation Staff of NEWS 2, 3; Circulation Staff 
of MIC 3; Floor Representative of Simmons Hall 3; Chair- 
man of Programs for Spring Spree 3; Chairman of Hostesses 
for Student Invitation Day 3: Simmons Handbook Staff 3; 
Technical Editor of MIC 4; House Counselor of Simmons 
Hall 4. 

FRIEDMAN, Rochelle Solin— Education; 201 A Holden 
Green, Cambridge. Massachusetts; Freshman Representative 
of Morse Hall. 

FROST, Marjorie E. — Science; 102 Arundel Avenue, West 
Hartford, Connecticut; President of Freshman Class; Execu- 
tive Board 2; Chairman of Junior Welcome Committee; Pres- 
ident of Pilgrim House 4. 

FUHRMANN, Judith — Business; Berg Carmelweg 6, Curaco, 
Netherlands Antilles. 

GALKIN, Thelma Beth — Science; 316 Meshanticut Valley 
Parkway, Cranston, Rhode Island; Hillel 1; Freshman Prom 
Committee; Committee for Christmas Cotillion 2; Fund Drive 
2; Class Executive Board 3, 4; Chairman of Committee for 
Junior Prom. 



GAULT, Joan — Retailing; 2111 Devonshire Street, Lansing 
Michigan; Glee Club; Prince Club. 

GEBER, Marion Judith — Retailing; 108 Calvert Terrace, Hag- 
erstown, Maryland; Floor Representative; Spring Spree. 

GERSH, Naomi Wolin— Education; 210 Winthrop Road, 
Brookline, Massachusetts; Glee Club; M.C. of Freshman-Jun- 
ior Skit Night 1; Campus Guide; Chairman of Freshman- 
Sophomore Valentine Party 2; Co-Chairman of Skit Night for 
Morse Hall; Song Leader of Morse Hall 2; Junior Welcome 
Committee; Bluettes 2; Leader 3. 

GOMAN, Priscilla Olmstead — Social Science; South East Street, 
Amherst, Massachusetts; Transfer from Chatham College; 
Campus Guide 3: Curriculum Evaluation Committee 3; Booth 
Chairman of Spring Spree 3. 

GOODALE, Elizabeth Anne Webber — Social Science; Littleton 
Road, Westford, Massachusetts; Co-Chairman of Sweatshirt 
Committee 2; Campus Guide 2, 3. 

GORDON, Deena — Social Science; 122 Cedric Road, Newton, 
Massachusetts; Freshman Office Staff; NEWS Circulation 1; 
Freshman Prom; Spring Spree 1, 2; Sophomore Luncheon; 
Freshman-Sophomore Prom 2; Cotillion 2; Co-Chairman of 
Dix Hall Door Decoration 3. 

GOUSE, Phyllis Edele — Social Science; 644 Union Street, 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire; Vice-President, President of 
Hillel; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

GRAY, Martha Hyndman — Nursing; 120 Peterborough Street, 
Boston, Massachusetts; Campus Guide 2, 3; Co-Chairman of 
Entertainment for May Breakfast 2; Secretary of Anne Strong 
Club 3; House Counselor of Longwood House 3. 

GRIFFIN, Barbara — Business; 18 Stearns Road, Belmont, 
Massachusetts; Commuter Representative of Newman Club 3; 
Secretary 4; Assistant Secretary of Student Government 3; Co- 
Chairman of Invitations for Spring Spree 3; Secretary-Treas- 
urer of Social Activities 4. 

GRYGENT, Marietta— Business; 948 West 7th Street, Plain- 
field, New Jersey; Technical Staff of NEWS 1; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Transfer Welcome Committee 3; Assistant Treas- 
urer for Spring Spree 3. 

GUSTAFSON, Marjorie — Home Economics; 72 Peterborough 
Street. Boston, Massachusetts; Transfer from the University 
of Washington; President of Home Economics Club 4; Student 
Government Academic Activities Committee. 

GUY, Patricia Ann — Science; 32 Valentine Road, Arlington 
74, Massachusetts; Glee Club 1; Vice-President of Modern 
Dance Club 4. 

HALEY, Sarah Anne — Nursing; 176 Manning Street, Hudson, 
Massachusetts; Newman Club; Anne Strong Club; Synchron- 
ized Swim Club. 

HANNEMAN, Linda Hayes — Home Economics; 147 Worth- 
ington Street, Boston, Massachusetts; Transfer from Washing- 
ton State University; Home Economics Club. 

HARRIGAN, June Frances — Science; 290 Washington Street, 
Salem, Massachusetts; Synchronized Swim Club 3; Academy 
3,4. 

HARRIS, Mildred Ruth — Nursing; 54 Canton Street, Lowell, 
Massachusetts; Anne Strong Club; Hillel; Campus Guide. 

HARRIS. Shirley Scholnick— Social Science; 67 Glover Ave- 
nue, North Quincy, Massachusetts; Freshman Executive 
Board; Freshman Office Staff; Hillel 1; Dance Committees 1, 
3; Fund Drive 2, 3; Advertising Committee of Spring Spree 2; 
Campus Guide 3; Academy 3, 4; Placement Commission 3, 4. 

HEBERT, Jacqueline Mahoney — Business; 98 Queensberry 
Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

HERIDEEN, Janet Judith— Science; 3 Morris Street, Webster, 
Massachusetts; Newman Club; President of Physical Therapy 
Club 4; Junior Representative 3. 



140 



HOFFMAN, Marilyn Elizabeth — Science; 79 Rumford Street, 
Concord, New Hampshire; Glee Club 1; Entertainment Chair- 
man of Sophomore Luncheon; M.C. of Skit Night; Page for 
May Breakfast 2; Sock 'n Buskin 2; Olde English Dinner 3; 
Song Leader of Evans Hall 3. 

HOMILLER, Carol Ware — Library Science; 25 Summer 
Street, Bedford, Massachusetts; Social Activities Chairman 
of Longwood House 1; Treasurer of North Hall 2; Vice-Pres- 
ident of I.V.C.F. 2; President 3; Floor Representative of North 
Hall 3; Campus Guide 3; Academy 4; Committee on Academic 
Activities 4. 

HOROWITZ, Eva — Social Science; 54 Bound Brook Road, 
Newton Highlands, Massachusetts; Hillel 1, 2; Sock 'n Buskin 
1; Waitress for Olde English Dinner 2; Ticket Committee for 
Sophomore Prom; Sophomore Workshop; Commission on 
Freshman Orientation 2; Campus Guide 2, 3; Junior Welcome 
Committee; Floor Representative in Simmons Hall; Olde Eng- 
lish Dinner 3; Washington Semester Program at American 
University, Washington, D. C. 

HOUSE, Susan— Education; 125 Rose Hill Avenue, New 
Rochelle, New York; NEWS Reporter 1; Secretary-Treasurer 
of Longwood House 2; Co-Chairman of May Breakfast 2; 
Student Government Representative 3; Chairman of FAD 4. 

HOWELL, Elizabeth — Home Economics; 12 Lincoln Street, 
Arlington, Massachusetts; Transfer from the University of 
Rhode Island; Outing Club 2; Home Economics Club 2, 3; 
Campus Guide 3. 

HURLEY, Britta Eileen — Nursing; 15 Fairbanks Road, Lex- 
ington 73, Massachusetts; Anne Strong Club. 

HYMAN, Joyce Diane — Social Science; 106 Conrad Drive, 
New Haven, Connecticut; Forum Representative 2, 3; Soph- 
omore Prom Committee; Sophomore Valentine Committee; 
Floor Representative of Dix Hall 3; Student Assistant of Dix 
Hall 4; Co-Chairman of Senior Week; Co-Chairman of Seat- 
ing for Olde English Dinner; Junior Welcome Committee; 
Committee on Academic Activities 4. 

JACOBSON, Judith Ann — Business; 3704 Fourth Avenue, 
Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania; Transfer from the University of 
Michigan; Social Work Volunteer 3; Transfer Welcome Com- 
mittee 4; Secretary of Honor Board 4; Student Government 
Committee on Academic Activities 4. 

JAROSH, Harriet Stallings — Library Science; 19 Hamilton 
Road, Brookline, Massachusetts; Transfer from Lasell Junior 
College. 

KAMENS, Patricia Libley — Home Economics; 39 Idaho 
Street, Passaic, New Jersey. 

KEITH, Gaila Patwell — Publication; 62 Houston Avenue, 
Milton, Massachusetts; Decoration Chairman Freshman-Soph- 
omore Valentine Party; Fire Proctor; Editor of MIC 4. 

KIRSCHENBAUM, Naomi Ruling-Social Science; 1810 Ave- 
nue N, Brooklyn 30, New York; Director of Sock 'n Buskin; 
Vice-President of Sock 'n Buskin. 

KRAMER, Fredda — Social Science; 308 Dwight Street, Water- 
bury, Connecticut; Hillel, Secretary 3; NEWS Staff; Campus 
Guide 2, 3; Junior Welcome Committee; Transfer Welcome 
Committee; Chairman of Waitresses for Olde English Dinner 
4; Senior Executive Board. 

KRAMER, Lois Jane — Library Science; 228 Mason Terrace, 
Brookline 46, Massachusetts; Forum Representative 1; Modern 
Dance Club; Secretary 3; Executive Board 4. 



KRIGER, Judith Margolin — Social Science; 
Boston, Massachusetts; Executive Board 3. 



117 Park Drive, 



LAKIN, Lynda Rose — Science; 35 Almont Street, Mattapan, 
Massachusetts. 

LANCE, Cynthia — Education; 39 Gramercy Park, New York 
10, New York. 



LANDSMAN, Marsha Naomi — Education; 24 Clover Street, 
New Bedford, Massachusetts; Social Activities Chairman for 
Dorm Students; Glee Club 1; Simmons NEWS 3, 4. 

LANG, Adelenc Joan — Education; 509 Tisdale Place, Wood- 
bridge, New Jersey; Transfer from Goucher College. 

LARSON, June Evelyn — Education; 101 Longwood Avenue, 
Brookline, Massachusetts; Junior Welcome Committee; Cam- 
pus Guide; Christian Association. 

LAVINE, Maxine Phoebe — Science; 9 Magnolia Road, Milton, 
Massachusetts; Freshman Commuter Representative; Co-Chair- 
man of Fund Drive 2; May Breakfast Court 2; Junior Wel- 
come Steering Committee; President of Student Government 4. 

LAZAR, Elizabeth Diane — Retailing; 36 Eustis Avenue, New- 
port, Rhode Island; Outing Club 1; Sock 'n Buskin 1; Orthodox 
Club 1, 2, 3; Prince Club 3. 

LEAR, Elizabeth H. — Social Science; 50 Nassau Drive, Great 
Neck, New York; Dance Club; Chairman of Poster Committee 
3; Chairman of Committee on Academic Activities 4; Olde 
English Dinner Committee 4. 

LEVISON, Louise — Nursing; 3505 Bayard Drive, Cincinnati 
8, Ohio; Hillel; Sock 'n Buskin; Glee Club. 

LEVITT, Abby Joyce — Science; 240 West Roxbury Parkway, 
Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts; Transfer from Skidmore College. 

LIEBMAN, Lois Ann — Retailing; 20 Leston Street, Mattapan, 
Massachusetts; Campus Guide 2; Sophomore Prom Commit- 
tee; Transfer Welcome Committee; Prince Club; Christmas 
Cotillion Committee. 

LOBER, Judith— publication; 172-70 Highland Avenue, Jamai- 
ca 32, New York; Glee Club 1, 2: Sock 'n Buskin 2; Photog- 
raphy Editor of MIC 4; Song Leader of North Hall 4. 

LOVIT, Norma Ruth— Science; 380 Johnson Street, Fall River, 
Massachusetts; Social Activities Chairman of Morse Hall 2. 

LUBARSKY, Roberta Lois— Publication; 28 Bridge Street, 
Quincy 69, Massachusetts; Settlement House Party 1; Soph- 
omore Prom Committee; Co-Chairman of May Breakfast 2; 
Chairman of Invitations for Junior Prom; Chairman of Tickets 
for Christmas Weekend 3; Secretary of Student Government 4; 
Co-Chairman of Olde English Dinner. 

LUBIN, Frances J. — Social Science; 15 Glenville Avenue, 
Allston, Massachusetts; Sock 'n Buskin; Chairman of Costumes 
for Olde English Dinner. 

LUFKIN, Ann — Social Science; Getty Lane, West Falmouth, 
Massachusetts; Sock 'n Buskin 1, 2; Social Relations Club 2; 
Publicity Chairman 3; Psychology Chairman 4; Secretary- 
Treasurer of Longwood House 3; President of Longwood 
House 4. 

MACIVER, Sandra L. — Home Economics; 922 LeRoy Road, 
Madison, Wisconsin; Curriculum Evaluation Committee 1; 
Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Vice-President 3; Campus 
Assistant Fire Chief 3; Academy 3, 4; Chairman of Simmons 
Handbook Committee 3. 

MATZ, Amy Rosaland — Social Science; 208 Rawson Road, 
Brookline. Massachusetts; NEWS; Volunteer Work; Hillel. 

McKELVIE, Janice May — Publication; 116 Mt. Vernon Street, 
Arlington, Massachusetts; Sock 'n Buskin 1; Glee Club 1; 
NEWS Technical Staff 1, 2; Copy Editor 3; Technical Editor 
4; President and Organizer of Simmons Young Republican 
Club 4. 

McWILLIAMS, Patti C— Nursing; 12 Stratford Road. Bar- 
rington, Rhode Island; Transfer from the University of Col- 
orado; Anne Strong Club; Volleyball Team for Small Houses; 
President of Hastings House 3; Treasurer of Hastings House 3. 

MERKIN. Sandra — Nursing; 181 Maple Avenue, Patchogue, 
New York; House Counselor of Simmons Hall 3; Simmons 
Delegate to National Student Nurse Convention 3. 



141 



MERRILL, Lois Lee — Home Economics; 15 Bramley Road, 
West Hartford, Connecticut; Academy; Home Economics 
Club; Secretary-Treasurer of Inter-Varsity Christian Fellow- 
ship 2, 3; Campus Guide 2, 3; Class Executive Board 4. 

METALIDES, Thalia — Home Economics; 38 Westland Aven- 
ue, Boston 15, Massachusetts; Home Economics Club. 

MICHEL, lacqueline — Social Science; 131 Park Drive, Boston, 
Massachusetts; Transfer from Oberlin College. 

MILLER, Susan Jane — Business; 33 Martin Road, Brockton, 
Massachusetts; Secretary of Outing Club 2; Campus Guide 2, 
3; Orchestra 2, 3; Social Activities Chairman of South Hall 3; 
House Counselor 4. 

MIMNO, Agnes Frances — Publication; 31 Walnut Street, 
Adams, Massachusetts; Glee Club 1; Secretary of Brookline 
House 1; Fire Captain of Brookline House 2; Campus Guide 
3; President of Brookline House 3. 

MITSCH, Mary Regina — Social Science; 10 Magnolia Road, 
Milton, Massachusetts; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Tennis Chair- 
man of Athletic Association 2, 3; Campus Guide 3; Junior 
Welcome Committee 3; Representative to Social Activities 4; 
Circulation Editor of MIC 4; Co-Chairman of Senior Lunch- 
eon 4; Executive Board 4. 

MOK, Edith — Business; 123 Chome Sendagrya, Shiboyaku, 
Tokyo, Japan; Transfer from Shorter College. 

MORGAN, Jane Ellen — Retailing: 147 Forest Street, Arling- 
ton, Massachusetts; President of Prince Club 4. 

MORGENSTERN, Penelope H.— Publication: 9 Auerbach 
Lane, Lawrence New York; Transfer from Skidmore College; 
Assistant Editor of MIC 4. 

MORIN, Agnes Elizabeth — Education; Broadway, West Yar- 
mouth, Massachusetts; Simmons Handbook Committee 2; Pres- 
ident of Junior Class; Placement Commission 1, 2; Chairman 

3,4. 

MORSE, Grace Ann — Home Economics; South Lancaster. 
Massachusetts; Glee Club 1; Bluettes 2, 3; Home Economics 
Club; Song Leader of South Hall 3; Senior Song Leader; Floor 
Representative of Arnold Hall 4. 

NEWBERG, Elaine S. — Science; 145 Savannah Avenue, Mat- 
tapan. Massachusetts; NEWS Staff 1, 2, 3; Managing Editor 
4; Hillel 1, 2; President 3: Spring Spree Booth Committee 1; 
Campus Guide 2. 

NIEBERLE, Maria Theresia — Nursing; Southern Avenue, Es- 
sex, Massachusetts. 

NORRIS, Katherine— Retailing; 185 Beale Street, Wollaston, 
Massachusetts; Executive Board 1, 2, 3; Athletic Association 
Representative 1; Secretary 2; Social Activities Representative 
3; Co-Chairman of Christmas Dance 3; Commuter Represen- 
tative of Student Government 4. 

NYMAN, Hadele Fay— Business; 84 Willow Street, Chelsea, 
Massachusetts; Representative to Social Activities 2; Glee 
Club 2, 3; Sock 'n Buskin 2, 3; Spring Spree Committee 2, 3; 
Vice-President of Class 3; Junior Welcome Committee; Honors 
Convocation Committee 3. 

OCCHIATO, Carole M.— Business; 521 Linda Vista, Pueblo, 
Colorado; Freshman Representative Council; Class Executive 
Board 1; North Hall Dorm Board 1; Class Executive Board 2; 
Co-Chairman of Fund Drive 2; House Counselor of South 
Hall 3; Treasurer of Class 3; Treasurer of Student Government 
4. 



OLSON, Beryl Dean — Science; 122 Broadmoor Road, Color- 
ado Springs, Colorado; Song Leader 1; Spring Spree Booth 
Chairman 1; Sophomore-Freshman Prom Chairman 2; Honor 
Board Representative 3: Chairman of Honor Board 4. 



OTTERSON, Charlotte A.— Nursing; Twin Bluffs Road, Red 
Wing, Minnesota; Transfer from Rockford College; Anne 
Strong Club 2, 3, 4; Treasurer 3; Curriculum Committee 3; 
Transfer Welcome Committee 3; Synchronized Swim Club 2; 
Fire Captain of South Hall 3; Chairman of Parent-Faculty Tea 
for Spring Spree. 

PAINE, Sarah Lansing — Publication; Shankhassick Farm, Dur- 
ham, New Hampshire; NEWS 2, 3; Secretary of North Hall 3; 
Editor of Simmons Handbook 3; President of North Hall 4. 

PARKS, Gail E. — Home Economics; 6 Beechmont Street, 
Worcester, Massachusetts; Publicity for Christian Association 
2; Junior Welcome Steering Committee; Fire Captain of Evans 
Hall 3, 4; President of Athletic Association 4; Home Econom- 
ics Club 2, 3, 4. 

PARSONS, Florence Harding — Business; 68 Avalon Road, 
Milton, Massachusetts; Transfer Welcome Committee 2; As- 
sistant Treasurer of Student Government 3. 

PARSONS, Jonelle E. — Library Science; 34 Lithgow Street, 
Waterville, Maine; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Manager 4; Secretary- 
Treasurer of Longwood House 1; Orchestra 3, 4; Floor Rep- 
resentative of North Hall 4. 

PEDROLI, Judith Ann — Home Economics; 22 Short Street, 
Milford, Massachusetts; Vice-President of Home Economics 
Club. 

PENNELL, Elizabeth Kimball— Business; 69 Court Street, 
Exeter, New Hampshire; House Counselor of North Hall 3; 
Co-Chairman of Cap and Gown Committee 4; Vice-President 
of North Hall 4. 

PERROTTA, Dianne — Science; 4 Baldwin Court, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts; Athletic Association; Executive Board 4. 

POWELL, Mary Anne Higgens — Business; 90 Darwin Drive, 
Snyder, New York; Representative to Class Executive Board 
1; Class Prom Committee 1, 2; Floor Representative to Arnold 
Hall Dorm Board 2; Spring Spree Committee 2; Junior Wel- 
come; President of Arnold Hall 4. 

PUDOLSKY, Ruth S.— Nursing; 35 Hansboro Street, Dor- 
chester, Massachusetts; Hillel 1; Olde English Dinner 2; Anne 
Strong Club. 

RADBORD. Marilyn Iris — Home Economics; 153 Alexander 
Avenue, Greensburg, Pennsylvania; Transfer from Pennsyl- 
vania State University; Treasurer of Morse Hall 2; President 
of Glee Club 4. 

RAE, Roberta Eleanor — Retailing; 14 Summer Street, Sanford, 
Maine; Class Officer 2; Social Activities Chairman of Evans 
Hall 2; Junior Welcome Committee; President of Evans Hall 
4; Sock 'n Buskin 2; Prince Club 2. 3, 4. 

RAHISER, Gladysann Simmonds — Business; 4400 McKee 
Drive, Pittsburgh 36, Pennsylvania: Modern Dance Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2; Sock 'n Buskin 1, 2, 3; Chairman of 
Simmons Drama Society 4; Spring Spree 2. 

REDDEN, Jean Ellen — Social Science; 4 Foster Street, Bar- 
rington, Rhode Island; Assistant Chairman of Sophomore 
Luncheon; Chairman of Tickets and Programs for Junior 
Prom; House Counselor of Hastings House 3; Student Assist- 
ant of Hastings House 4; Honor Board Representative 4. 

REEVES, Rosalind A. — Education; 1 Blauvelt Place, Scars- 
dale, New York; Floor Representative of Simmons Hall 2; 
House Counselor of Simmons Hall 3; President of Christian 
Science Organization 3; Co-Chairman of Spring Spree Booth 
Committee 3; Student Assistant of Simmons Hall 4. 

RENNIE, Carol Ann — Retailing; 78 Emerson Road, Milton 
86, Massachusetts; Floor Representative of Simmons Hall 1; 
MIC Advertising Staff 1; Campus Guide 2; Committee for 
May Breakfast 2; Co-Chairman of Spring Spree 3; Committee 
Chairman of Christmas Dance 3; House Counselor of Sim- 
mons Hall 4. 

RESNIC, Irma Kass — Business; 1870 Commonwealth Avenue, 
Brighton 35, Massachusetts; Campus Guide 2, 3; Junior Wel- 
come Committee; Class Executive Board 4; Student Govern- 
ment Workshop 4. 



142 



RESN1CK, Vivian Edna — Science: 308 Amsterdam Avenue, 
Bridgeport 6, Connecticut; Hillel; Outing Club; Class Commit- 
tees; Sophomore Luncheon. 

RICE, Adele Louise — Nursing; 732 Ball Avenue, Watertown, 
New York; Social Activities Chairman; Campus Guide; Anne 
Strong Club. 

RICHMAN, Susan F. — Social Science; 28 London Terrace, 
New Rochelle, New York; Hillel; Campus Guide; Treasurer of 
Dix Hall 3; Floor Representative of Morse Hall 4. 

ROBBINS, Barbara Brerida — Science; 1225 Midland Avenue, 
Bronxville, New York; Outing Club 1, 2, 3; Hillel. 

RODRIGUES, Christine Marie — Nursing; 397 Hawthorne 
Avenue, Derby, Connecticut; Anne Strong Club; Campus 
Guide. 

ROSENBLOOM, Judith Leanore — Library Science; 1174 Wal- 
ton Avenue, Sherbrooke, P. Q., Canada; Floor Representative 
to Dorm Board in Morse Hall 1; Volunteer Service 1; Glee 
Club 1, 2; Hillel 1, 2; Interfaith Council 2, 3. 

ROSENFIELD, Judith Paula — Business; 302 Lawrence Road, 
Medford, Massachusetts; NEWS Advertising Manager 2, 3, 4; 
Mimeograph Chairman 3; Chairman of Door Decorations 2. 

ROSOFF, Miriam H. — Science; 16 Allandale Street, Jamaica 
Plain, Massachusetts; Hillel; Freshman Prom Committee; Jun- 
ior Welcome Steering Committee; Chairman of Auction for 
Spring Spree. 

ROTHENBERG, Lois Elizabeth — Education; 132 Bently Ave- 
nue, Jersey City, New Jersey; Hillel. 

RUBIN, Claire Bernice — Social Science; 58 Hutchins Road, 
Medford, Massachusetts; Hillel; Athletic Association; Junior 
Welcome; NEWS; Student Government; Washington Semester 
Program 4; Massachusetts Student Intern Program. 

RUBIN, Deborah — Library Science; 403 Lee Street, Brookline 
46, Massachusetts; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; American History Discus- 
sion Group 3; Commuter Organization 4; Commuter Repre- 
sentative to South Hall 4. 

SAMUELSON, Diane Miller— Business; 598 Walnut Street, 
Newtonville. Massachusetts; Transfer from the University of 
Colorado; Junior Executive Board; Spring Spree 3. 

SANDI, Laura Rose — Business; 764 Mt. Auburn Street, Water- 
town 72, Massachusetts; Glee Club; Newman Club; Vice- 
President and President of French Club. 

SARNO, Carol Ann — Retailing; 21 Circle Street, Marblehead, 
Massachusetts; Prince Club; Newman Club. 

SCHLAFMAN, Carol Ann— Education; 112 Colbourne Road, 
Brighton, Massachusetts; Campus Guide; Chairman of Spring 
Spree Auction; Senior Executive Board. 

SCHMIDT, Ila Mae— Home Economics; 38 Ridge Road, 
Great Notch, New Jersey; Vice-President of Class 1; President 
of Class 2; Dorm Representative to Social Activities 3; Execu- 
tive Board of Junior Welcome Committee; Chairman of Social 
Activities 4; Student Government Association 4; Student 
Government Workshop 2, 3, 4; Swim Club 2, 3; Outing Club 
2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4. 

SCHWARTZ, Judith Ruth— Social Science; 40 Fleetwood Ave- 
nue, Mount Vernon, New York. 

SEIDENSTEIN, Rosalind— Science; 1043 Beach 25 Street, 
Far Rockaway 91, New York; Physical Therapy Club. 

SENKLER, Abigail Dickson — Home Economics; Lowell Road, 
Carlisle, Massachusetts; Transfer from Carleton College; 
Home Economics Club. 

SEVERANCE, Marianne — Business; Box 684, Marion, Massa- 
chusetts; Modern Dance Club 2; Secretary of North Hall 4. 



SEYMON, Beverly Doreen — Retailing; 285 Cooke Street, 
Waterbury, Connecticut; Secretary of Prince Club; Junior 
Welcome Committee. 

SHAIN, Heather Renee — Education; 46A Trowbridge Street, 
Cambridge, Massachusetts; NEWS Special Writer; ICARUS; 
Modern Dance Club; Sock 'n Buskin. 

SHEPARD, Joanne — Retailing; 16 Warren Street, Beverly, 
Massachusetts; Sock 'n Buskin 1, 2; Campus Guide 2, 3; 
Prince Club 2, 3, 4; Class Executive Board 4. 

SHERWOOD, Robin— Publication; R.F.D. #1, Glen Falls, 
New York; Treasurer of Forum 1; Athletic Association 1, 2; 
NEWS Reporter 1, 2; Treasurer of Hastings House 2; President 
of Christian Association 3; Literary Editor of MIC 4; Campus 
Representative of Experiment in International Living 4. 

SIBLEY, Julie Phillips — Publication: 4 Kilsyth Terrace, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts; Glee Club; Secretary of Class 3; Assembly 
Series 3. 4. 

SIDMAN, Joan Rotman — Education; 1872 Commonwealth 
Avenue, Brighton, Massachusetts; Glee Club 1. 

SLOAN E, Linda Darr — Education; 121 Presidents Lane, 
Quincy, Massachusetts. 

SMITH, Patricia Ann — Science; 233 Clark Avenue, Short 
Beach. Connecticut; Floor Representative of Simmons Hall 
2; House Counselor of Simmons Hall 3; Campus Guide 3; 
Athletic Association 3; Executive Board 3; Curriculum Re- 
evaluation Committee 3; Treasurer of Spring Spree 3; Student 
Assistant of Simmons Hall 4. 

SNEIDMAN, Louise Rita — Home Economics: 10 Beechwood 
Road, Hartsdale, New York; Freshman Office Staff; Dorm 
Board in Simmons Hall 2, 3; House Counselor of Simmons 
Hall 3; Co-Chairman of Fund Drive 3; Dorm Representative 
to Social Activities 4; Class Executive Board 4; Co-Chairman 
of Seating and Hostesses for Olde English Dinner 4; Co- 
Chairman of Senior Faculty Dinner 4. 

SOLTZ, Wendy Joan — Education: 170-25 Highland Avenue, 
Jamaica, New York; Academy; Sweet Briar Junior Year in 
France; Modern Dance Club. 

STEIN, Gail Saperstein — Education; 380 The Riverway, Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts; Executive Board; Dance Committee for 
Spring Spree. 

STERN, Nancy — Social Science; 15 Thatcher Street, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts; Class Executive Board 1; Glee Club 
Executive Board 1; Hillel 1, 2; Fund Drive 1. 2; Office Staff; 
Spring Spree Ticket Chairman 1; Sophomore Workshop 2; 
Tennis Team 1. 2; N.S.A. 2; Co-Chairman of Junior Welcome 
Committee; N.S.A. Executive Board 3; Sophomore Workshop 
Executive Board 3; Spring Spree 3: Young Republican Club 4; 
Olde English Dinner 4. 

STILES, Naomi Lee — Nursing; 625 High Street, Chester. 
New York; Glee Club 1; Executive Board 2; Sophomore Class 
Song Leader; Anne Strong Club 2, 3, 4; House Counselor of 
Arnold Hall 3. 

ST. ONGE, Elizabeth Anne — Home Economics; 7 Arden 
Road, Worcester 6, Massachusetts; Class Executive Board 1; 
Freshman Mixer Committee; Fire Captain 2; Class Executive 
Board 3; President of Appleton House 3: Home Economics 
Club 2, Executive Board 3, President 4. 

STROUSE. Jean Ellen— Social Science; 419 Ashbourne Road, 
Elkins Park, Pennsylvania; Poster Club; Assembly Committee. 

SUHER, Barbara S. — Education; 232 Sumner Avenue. Spring- 
field 8, Massachusetts; Co-Chairman of Skit Night in Dix 
Hall 1; Freshman Office Staff; Glee Club 1; Sophomore Lunch- 
eon; Committee Head of May Breakfast 2; Sophomore Work- 
shop; Reporter for Simmons NEWS 2; Junior Year in Den- 
mark; Floor Representative in Simmons Hall 4; NSA Rep- 
resentative 4; NSA Travel Representative 4. 



143 



SWASEY, Susan Keith — Business; 55 Ellicott Avenue, Ba- 
tavia, New York; Glee Club 1; Refreshment Chairman for 
Sophomore Prom; Campus Guide 2, 3; Co-Chairman of Tick- 
ets for Spring Spree 3; Secretary of House Presidents Council 
4. 

TANCRETI, Mary Frances Corsetti — Home Economics; 1 1 
Naples Avenue, Woburn, Massachusetts; Newman Club; Home 
Economics Club; Junior Welcome Club. 

TAYLOR, Ann — Home Economics; 42 Webster Street, Need- 
ham, Massachusetts; Newman Club; Treasurer of Home Eco- 
nomics Club. 

TITCHELL, Arlene I. — Education; 199 Somerset Avenue, 
Winthrop. Massachusetts; MIC Advertising Staff; NEWS Cir- 
culation Staff; Junior Welcome Committee; Co-Chairman of 
Spring Spree 4. 

TRIBE, Janet Barbara — Home Economics; 61 Bergen Boule- 
vard, Palisades Park, New Jersey; Executive Board 1, 2; Chris- 
tian Association 1; Home Economics Club 2, 3. 4; Synchron- 
ized Swim Club 2, 3; Junior Welcome Steering Committee; 
Campus Guide 3; Academy 3, 4; Transfer Welcome Steering 
Committee 4; Co-Chairman of Senior-Faculty Dinner. 

VOSS, Judith Sweet — Science; 107 Oak Street, Oxbridge, Mas- 
sachusetts; Outing Club 1; Athletic Association Intermurals 
1, 2; Campus Guide 2; Simmons Basketball Team 2; Sopho- 
more Luncheon; Treasurer of Athletic Association 3; Junior 
Welcome Committee; Olde English Dinner 3; President of 
Longwood House 3: Representative to Student Government 4; 
Student Assistant of Longwood House 4. 

WALTER, Carol Ann — Home Economics; 2163 Harcourt 
Dirve, Cleveland Heights, Ohio; Floor Representative in North 
Hall 1; Class Executive Board 3; Home Economics Club 1, 2; 
Treasurer 3; Club Project Chairman 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Academy 3, 4; Treasurer of Massachusetts Home Eco- 
nomics Club; House Counselor of Evans Hall 4. 



WELCH, Mary Gertrude — Retailing; 
North Adams, Massachusetts. 



164 Church Street, 



WATRIN, Dorothea Sinko- 
nue, Allston, Massachusetts. 



-Social Science; 57 Brighton Ave- 



WEILL, Patricia Gene — Publication; 1185 Park Avenue, New 
York, New York; NEWS Technical Staff 1; Writing Staff 2; 
Technical Editor 3; Editor-in-Chief 4; Freshman Office Staff; 
Chairman of NEWS Banquet 2; Campus Guide 2; Chairman 
of Programs for Sophomore Luncheon; House Counselor of 
Dix Hall 3; FAD 3; Editor of Simmons Datebook 3. 



WEST, Sandra Ann — Science; 31 Newtowne Court, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts: Co-Chairman of Spring Spree Booth 1; 
Athletic Association 1; Student Government 1; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Publicity Chairman 3; Executive Board 3; Outing Club; Ellen 
Richards Club; Campus Guide 2, 3; Senior Week; Publicity 
Chairman for Spring Spree 4. 

WIENER, Irma Z. — Science; 51 Richmond Avenue, Worcester, 
Massachusetts; Sophomore Ring Chairman; Campus Guide 2; 
Floor Representative of Morse Hall 2; Sock 'n Buskin 2; Hillel 
2; Hillel-Oneg Chairman 3; Chairman of Campus Guides 3; 
Secretary of Outing Club 3; Financial Chairman of Junior 
Prom; President of Forum 4. 

WINTER, Susan— Social Science; 8014 North Lake Drive, 
Milwaukee 17, Wisconsin; Transfer from the University of 
Michigan; Chairman of Transfer Welcome Committee. 

WOODMAN, Janice M. — Nursing; 15 Johnson Road, Fal- 
mouth, Maine; Campus Guide 2; Transfer Welcome Commit- 
tee 2; Anne Strong Club Representative to N.C.S.N.A. 3; 
President 3; Junior Welcome Committee 3; Synchronized Swim 
Club 3; Dorm Officer 3. 

WOODS, Alice Mary — Science; 45 Concord Avenue, Milton, 
Massachusetts; Freshman Office Staff; Newman Club 1, 2; 
Social Activities Representative 3; Campus Guide 3; President 
of Turner House 4. 

YAMAUCHI, June — Library Science; 1246 Palolo Avenue, 
Honolulu 16. Hawaii; NSA Representative 2, 3; NSA Spring 
Spree Booth Chairman 1; Social Activities Chairman of North 
Hall 2; Floor Representative of North Hall 3; Student Govern- 
ment Representative of North Hall 4; Co-Chairman of Tickets 
for Olde English Dinner 4. 

YESLEY, Louise S. — Social Science; 8 Whitney Road, Newton- 
ville, Massachusetts; Student Faculty Tea 1; Fire Captain of 
Dix Hall 2; Junior Welcome Committee; Treasurer of Poster 
Committee 4. 

ZIGELBAUM, Ann Ruth Butman — Business; 24 Wolcott 
Road, Lynn. Massachusetts; Co-Chairman of Strawberry 
Breakfast 2; Editor of School of Business Newspaper 3; As- 
sistant Fire Captain of Morse Hall 3. 



144 



Patrons 



Mr. and Mrs. William F. Adler 

Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Behle 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Bergfalk, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. B. Berman 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Campbell 

Mrs. Dorothy P. Clark 

Mrs. Adele Newfield Cohen 

Mr. Lazarus Diemont 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Eastman 

Mr. and Mrs. Max Edelstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert W. Frost 

Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Gabel 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman S. Galkin 

Mrs. Winifred M. Geiger 

Mr. and Mrs. Earle W. Goman 

Mr. Herbert Harris 

Mrs. Helen M. Horkheimer 

Mr. Sanford W. House 

Mr. D. E. Hyndman 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Keith 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip E. Lear 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Levitt 

Mr. and Mrs. Eben P. Lufkin 

Mr. and Mrs. William McKelvie 

Mrs. John D. Mitsch 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Morgenstern 

Mrs. Irene M. Neary 

Mr. and Mrs. Morris Nyman 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Occhiato 

Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Parsons 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Perrotta 

Mr. William Powell, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Redden 

Mr. and Mrs. Carleton Reeves 

Mrs. Grace M. Rennie 

Mr. Harry M. Resnick 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Rice 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron W. Richman 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Robbins 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Rothenberg 

Mr. Herman A. Russian 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul L. Sandi, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob E. Schmidt 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Sloane 

Mr. Melvin Sneidman 

Mr. Henry E. Vogel 

Mrs. Laura L. Ware 



145 



Compliments of 

PARAMOUNT 
UNIFORM COMPANY 

577 Washington Street 
Boston 11, Massachusetts 

455 Brookline Avenue 554 Main Street 
Boston Worcestor 


Vic's Launderette and 
Dry Cleaning 

270 BROOKLINE AVENUE 
Tel. ASpinwall 7-6243 

BOX STORAGE— $3.95 
Plus Cleaning 


NELSON DRUG CO., INC. 

M. H. Bennett, PH.G., R.PH. 
PRESCRIPTION EXPERTS 

Drugs, Cosmetics, Toiletries 


With Our Best Wishes 

THE SHERATON-PLAZA 

BOSTON 

H. de F. "Dan" Nyboe, General Manager 


be proud 

of the hotel where your family 
or friends stay when 
visiting Boston. 

suggest y^ r ~ + 

the j^wcktx ^ousb 

Internationally famous for 
Old Bostonian graciousness in 
modern comfort. All rooms with 
private bath, TV, radio. 

PRIVATELY OWNED AND OPERATED BY 
THE SHERRARD FAMILY 


KENMORE PHARMACY, 
INC. 

Main Store — 500 Commonwealth Ave. 
Branch Store — 65 Massachusetts Ave. 

Ten Registered Pharmacists 

Boston's Outstanding Prescription Stores 

Complete Lines of Finest Cosmetics 



146 




executive and sales offices 
located in the Chrysler building 
405 lexington avenue, n. y. 17, n.y. 



incite 



official photographers to the 

1961 MICROCOSM 




**£R\vV <S> 

MEMBER 



specialists in fine photography throughout new england 



SAMUEL HOLMES, INC 

Poultry and Game 
Boston's Premier Poultry House 

Telephones 84 Clinton Street Schools, Hospitals 
CApitol 7-0708 R q Hotels, Restaurants 
0709-0710 aost ° n y ' Mass - Airlines 

Government Approved Plant U.S.D.A. No. 1525 


Compliments of the 
Class of 1963 


Compliments of the 
Class of 1964 


BARNABY, INC. 

Florists 

Say It With Flowers 

11 Harvard St. Brookline, Mass. 
Tel. LOngwood 6-5626 


Compliments 
of 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

Girls School & College Outfitters 

462 Boylston Street 
Boston 16, Mass. 


CApital 7-0310-0311 -0312 

SWAN, NEWTON & COMPANY 

Meats and Poultry, Frozen Fruits and Vegetables 
Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

2-8 Faneuil Hall Market Boston, Mass. 

Established in 1867 



148 



Compliments 
of 

the Class 

of 

1962 


MEDICAL CENTER 
PHARMACY 

319 Longwood Ave. Boston, Mass. 

Opposite the Children's Hospital 
Boston's only professional pharmacy 


GENERAL RADIO COMPANY 

Pioneer Electronic 

Manufacturer Instruments 

Welcomes Simmons Graduates 

To Investigate 

Secretarial — Accounting — Statistical 

Job Opportunities 

In 

Secretarial — Engineering — Sales 

New Offices: 22 Baker Ave. 

West Concord, Mass. 

For interviews contact 

Miss Coyle CI 9-8900 


Compliments of 

STARLITE SHOP, INC. 

274 Brookline Ave. 

Boston, Mass. 
Tel. BEacon 2-7633 


Compliments of 

ARTHUR ARMOND 
BEAUTY SALON 

266 Brookline Ave. 

Boston, Mass. 
Tel. BEacon 2-6236 


BOLTON SMART CO., INC. 

Wholesale Purveyors of Choice 

Beef — Lamb — Veal — Pork — Poultry 

Butter — Cheese — Eggs — Frosted Food 

19-25 SOUTH MARKET ST. BOSTON, MASS. 

Phone LAfayette 3-1900 



149 





Famous for 




Good Foods 




Delicacies 




Perfumery 


Compliments 


S. S. PIERCE CO. 


of 


Store at 133 Brookline Ave. 


the Class 
of 






1961 


Compliments of 




the 




SIMMONS 




COOPERATIVE STORE 


THE AUSTIN COMPANY 


ENGINEERS AND BUILDERS 


NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



150 



DICKSON BROTHERS 

Kitchen Furnishings 
Hardware — Electric Appliances 

26 Brattle Street 
Cambridge 38, Massachusetts 


THE 
HOTEL STATLER 

Boston, Mass. 

Extends Greetings and Good Wishes 
To SIMMONS COLLEGE 
Its Students and Faculty 

Visit Our TERRACE ROOM 
Dining and Dancing 
With Famed Bands 

James P. Duchscherer 
General Manager 


one minute from beth Israel hospital 

open door shoe salon, inc. 

274 brookline avenue 

boston, massachusetts 

beacon 2-3770 


Compliments of the 

LONGWOOD PHARMACY 

411 Brookline Ave. Boston, Mass. 
Phone LO 6-3333 

Prescription Specialists 
Five Pharmacists 


DIEGES & CLUST 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

226 Public St. Providence, R. I. 

RINGS PINS 
MEDALS CHARMS TROPHIES 


ROBERT ROLLINS BLAZERS, 
INC. 

832 Broadway New York 3, N. Y. 

Specialized Blazer Service to 
Schools Classes 
Colleges Athletic Teams 
Golf Clubs Award Committees 
Sororities Bands 
Fraternities Glee Clubs 
Honor Societies Choral Groups 


Keep in Touch with Simmons 
Through 

NEWS 

Subscription Rate 
$3.00 per year 



151 




; .-..,:•: 



idea man . . . 

the Keller yearbook 

representative 





To the casual reader a yearbook is often simply an 
"album" of pictures with accompanying identi- 
fications and enough written text to fill up the re- 
maining holes on the pages. Merely ink on paper 
. . . though nice to own and enjoy. 

But to the staff and the adviser the yearbook 
means much more. For yearbook work comprises 
a multitude of details: Layout, Art, Photography, 
Copy, Typography, Covers and Binding (not to 
mention the small detail of money-raising). 
Highly technical and often confusing, these details 
are at the very least time-consuming and a source 
of anxiety to a staff unless the publisher's repre- 
sentative is company-trained to give needed help 
and suggestions. 

All representatives for Wm. J. Keller Inc. are 
skilled in the many facets of yearbook work, hav- 
ing at their finger-tips the answers to yearbook 
problems as well as a multitude of ideas for new 
graphic arts special effects, to enable the staff to 
produce a yearbook that is different and attractive. 
Your Keller salesman is more than a technical ad- 
viser, he is a "clearing-house" of yearbook ideas. 



ROSWELL FARNHAM 



^ 



Wm. J. Keller Inc. 

Publishers of Finer Yearbooks 
Buffalo 15, New York 



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